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Case Reports in Gastrointestinal Medicine
Volume 2017, Article ID 3718954, 2 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/3718954
Case Report

Undigested Pills in Stool Mimicking Parasitic Infection

1Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University of Missouri, Columbia, 1 Hospital Drive, Columbia, MO 65212, USA
2Department of Internal Medicine, Erie County Medical Center, 1 John James Audubon Pkwy, Buffalo, NY 14228, USA

Correspondence should be addressed to Veysel Tahan; ude.iruossim.htlaeh@vnahat

Received 25 July 2016; Accepted 15 January 2017; Published 31 January 2017

Academic Editor: Yucel Ustundag

Copyright © 2017 Fazia Mir et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Background. Orally ingested medications now come in both immediate release and controlled release preparations. Controlled release preparations were developed by pharmaceutical companies to improve compliance and decrease frequency of pill ingestion. Case Report. A 67-year-old obese male patient presented to our clinic with focal abdominal pain that had been present 3 inches below umbilicus for the last three years. This pain was not associated with any trauma or recent heavy lifting. Upon presentation, the patient reported that for the last two months he started to notice pearly oval structures in his stool accompanying his chronic abdominal pain. This had coincided with initiation of his nifedipine pills for his hypertension. He reported seeing these undigested pills daily in his stool. Conclusion. The undigested pills may pose a cause of concern for both patients and physicians alike, as demonstrated in this case report, because they can mimic a parasitic infection. This can result in unnecessary extensive work-up. It is important to review the medication list for extended release formulations and note that the outer shell can be excreted whole in the stool.