Case Reports in Infectious Diseases
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Acceptance rate43%
Submission to final decision103 days
Acceptance to publication31 days
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Invisible Facial Flushing in Two Cases of Dengue Infection and Influenza Detected by PC Program and Smartphone App: Decorrelation Stretching and K-Means Clustering

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Case Reports in Infectious Diseases publishes case reports and case series in all areas of hematology, including general hematology, pathology, and oncology, with a specific focus on lymphomas and leukemias.

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Case Reports in Infectious Diseases maintains an Editorial Board of practicing researchers from around the world, to ensure manuscripts are handled by editors who are experts in the field of study.

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Case Report

Invasive Group B Streptococcal Infection with Toxic Shock-Like Syndrome in a Postsplenectomy Patient

The incidence of invasive group B streptococcal disease (GBS) in nonpregnant population is increasing. As per the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), there are 10 cases in every 100,000 nonpregnant adults each year, and 1 in 20 nonpregnant adults with serious GBS infections die. GBS infection is almost always associated with underlying risk factors such as diabetes mellitus or malignancy. We present a 47-year-old female with a remote history of splenectomy presented with toxic shock-like syndrome secondary to invasive GBS infection.

Case Report

Severe Pulmonary Infection in a 20-Month-Old Female

Community-Acquired Pneumonia (CAP) is a common reason for hospitalization of a pediatric patient. We report a 20-month-old female admitted for suspected CAP. History included a week-long cough, fever, dyspnea, single occurrence of seizure-like activity, and a sick contact. Initial chest X-ray (CXR) showed left lower lobe pneumonia and parapneumonic effusion with a complex left pleural effusion. Ultrasound findings prompted the need for contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) of the chest. Contrast-enhanced CT of the chest confirmed a large pleural effusion with major atelectasis and mediastinal shift. The patient was treated with empiric antibiotics, video-assisted thoracoscopic surgical (VATS) decortication of empyema, and chest tube placement. Due to intraoperative complications, the VATS decortication was aborted and patient was transferred to the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU). A thoracentesis with culture failed to isolate a bacterial organism. Dexamethasone was started after repeat CXR showed persistent infiltrate. Subsequent contrast-enhanced CT of the chest showed a large collection of air and persistent consolidation. The patient received repeat VATS decortication and reinsertion of a chest tube. Repeat pleural fluid cultures failed to isolate a bacterial organism. Infectious disease (ID) consult recommended linezolid 140 mg Q8H for 4 weeks. Seven days after second VATS, a respiratory pathogen panel was positive for rhinovirus/enterovirus. With resolution of leukocytosis and clinical improvement, the patient was discharged with the chest tube in place and pediatric surgery outpatient follow-up. After three months, sequalae from both the infection and interventions presented .

Case Report

Fecal Microbial Transplantation for the Treatment of Persistent Multidrug-Resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae Infection in a Critically Ill Patient

Dysbiosis of the microbiome is a common finding in critically ill patients, who receive broad-spectrum antibiotics and various forms of organ support. Multidrug-resistant (MDR) organisms are a growing threat in all areas of medicine, but most markedly in the critically ill, where there is both loss of host defences and widespread use of broad spectrum antibiotics. We present a case of a critically ill patient with persistent MDR Klebsiella pneumoniae infection, successfully treated with fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT), using stool of a rigorously-screened, healthy donor. FMT for Clostridium difficile colitis has been well described in the literature and is an established therapy for recurrent infections with Clostridium difficile. The use of FMT for other multidrug-resistant organisms is less frequently described, particularly in the context of critically ill patients. In our case, we have culture-documented clearance of the MDR Klebsiella pneumoniae form a patient of FMT.

Case Report

Coronary Artery Spasms Mimicking Acute ST-Elevation Myocardial Infarction in Dengue Haemorrhagic Fever

Dengue is an arboviral febrile illness endemic in many tropical and subtropical regions with frequent epidemics. Although most cases are self-limiting, progression into dengue haemorrhagic fever can have dire outcomes. The course can also be complicated by infrequent occurrence of unusual clinical manifestations which are increasingly recognized. We describe the case of a 16-year-old previously healthy girl diagnosed with dengue, who went on to develop severe ischaemic-type central chest pain towards the end of the critical phase of dengue haemorrhagic fever. Urgent investigation revealed acute ST-segment elevations in the high lateral leads of a surface electrocardiogram which completely reverted to normal within 2 hours, associated with elevated cardiac biomarkers but normal findings on transthoracic 2D echocardiography. She was managed with high-dose statins, nitrates, and pain relievers and made an uneventful recovery without any further episodes. The possible explanation for the presentation was focal myocarditis leading to coronary artery spasms.

Case Report

Acute Rheumatic Fever: A Disease of the Past?

Introduction. Acute rheumatic fever (ARF) is a manifestation of the nonsuppurative sequelae of Streptococcus pyogenes infection. Herein, two cases of ARF are presented to highlight that this disease is present in urban cities, can be diagnosed in otherwise healthy children, and that its diagnosis may be challenging, or marred with confounders, leading to delays in diagnosis. Case Report. Two unrelated children, age 7 and 9, presented to an urban hospital in Canada with unique manifestations of ARF. Diagnosis of ARF in the first patient was interrupted by a course of steroids which masked symptoms leading to therapeutic delays. The second patient presented with facial droop and symptoms thought to be viral, thus leading to misdiagnosis as Bell’s palsy. Discussion/Conclusion. ARF is more common in underserviced and marginalized populations, which may lead clinicians in urban centers to overlook signs or symptoms suggestive of ARF because they no longer see this condition routinely, or they believe it is a disease of the past.

Case Report

Frequently Relapsing Anterior Nodular Scleritis as the Initial Presentation of a Lethal Systemic Infection: Disseminated Tuberculosis with HIV Coinfection

Background. Scleritis is a painful inflammatory ocular disease often associated with an underlying systemic illness mostly having an autoimmune aetiology. Tuberculosis usually presents as pulmonary infection, and the ocular presentation is considered to be rare. Case presentation. We present a male who developed prolonged pyrexia following systemic steroids while being investigated for a frequently relapsing anterior scleritis. Biopsy of sclera demonstrated acid-fast bacilli, and histology of sclera and lymph node showed granulomatous inflammation with caseation. Contrast CT demonstrated mediastinal and visceral lymphadenopathy with pulmonary changes suggesting disseminated tuberculosis. Later, Western blot confirmed coinfection with HIV with a CD4 count of 71 cells/mm3. He was treated with antituberculous medications, and then HAART was initiated within two months. He showed good response and showed a partial resolution of scleritis at the end of two months. Conclusion. Tuberculosis tends to occur in unusual sites when coinfected with HIV. Scleritis is a rare extrapulmonary manifestation of tuberculosis. High degree of suspicion is critical in making diagnosis and commencing early treatment.

Case Reports in Infectious Diseases
 Journal metrics
Acceptance rate43%
Submission to final decision103 days
Acceptance to publication31 days
CiteScore-
Impact Factor-
 Submit