Case Reports in Infectious Diseases
 Journal metrics
See full report
Acceptance rate34%
Submission to final decision103 days
Acceptance to publication17 days
CiteScore-
Journal Citation Indicator0.180
Impact Factor-

A Patient with Concurrent Legionella and COVID-19 Infection in a UK District General Hospital

Read the full article

 Journal profile

Case Reports in Infectious Diseases publishes case reports and case series related to infectious diseases of bacterial, viral and parasitic origin.

 Editor spotlight

Case Reports in Infectious Diseases maintains an Editorial Board of practicing researchers from around the world, to ensure manuscripts are handled by editors who are experts in the field of study.

 Abstracting and Indexing

This journal's articles appear in a wide range of abstracting and indexing databases, and are covered by numerous other services that aid discovery and access. Find out more about where and how the content of this journal is available.

Latest Articles

More articles
Case Report

Amp-CKlebsiella-Induced Chorioamnionitis and Associated Abnormalities in Cardiotocography: A Case Report with a Narrative Review

Introduction. Infections caused by multidrug-resistant organisms are on the rise in obstetric patients. Chorioamnionitis is associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes. If caused by multidrug-resistant organisms, chorioamnionitis is associated with high maternal and fetal morbidity. Due to the paucity of the literature and the challenges associated with their diagnosis, the diagnosis is usually delayed. This often leads to delays in management, and hence, adverse maternal and neonatal outcomes are noted. Important Clinical Findings. The patient presented with prelabour rupture of membranes for three days. She developed chorioamnionitis in labour, which was refractory to broad spectrum antibiotics. Persistent tachycardia with variable decelerations followed by prolonged fetal deceleration was observed in cardiotocography. Delivery of baby was done by cesarean section in the view of pathological findings in cardiotocography. The primary diagnoses, interventions, and outcomes. Based on the placental culture results, Amp-C Klebsiella-induced chorioamnionitis was diagnosed. Ertapenem was commenced after the sensitivity results. Good feto-maternal outcomes were observed. The neonate was admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit and discharged home in stable condition. Conclusions. Cases of multidrug-resistant organisms-induced chorioamnionitis are rarely reported, though they are associated with maternal morbidity and poor neonatal outcome. In cases of chorioamnionitis, caution should be taken in cases that are refractory to broad-spectrum antibiotics, and multidrug-resistant organisms should be suspected and managed to improve pregnancy outcome.

Case Report

A Case Report and Literature Review of Babesiosis-Induced Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

Babesiosis, a tick-borne protozoan disease, has been increasing in frequency in recent years. Familiarity with presentations of babesiosis is important for clinicians. Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a rarely seen complication of severe babesiosis. In most cases, the patients with babesiosis developed ARDS several days after initiation of antibabesia therapy. We present a unique case of babesiosis without any respiratory symptoms on presentation who developed ARDS within 24 hours of babesiosis treatment initiation. Furthermore, we reviewed published cases of ARDS in babesiosis.

Case Report

Atypical Manifestation of VZV Infection in a Vaccinated Immunocompetent Adult

Introduction. Aseptic meningitis can occur from different types of infections of which viral etiologies are the most common. Varicella zoster virus (VZV) nowadays is considered a familiar entity of aseptic meningitis. However, it is usually reported in immunocompromised patients. For cases of VZV meningitis that are observed, a rash has been noted before the onset of meningitis or sometimes after it. Clinical Case. We present an uncommon case of VZV meningitis in an 18-year-old immunocompetent male who did not have a rash on presentation and did not develop one during his course either. Cerebrospinal fluid showed lymphocyte-predominant leukocytosis and elevated protein with normal glucose suggestive of aseptic meningitis. Cerebrospinal fluid polymerase chain reaction (CSF PCR) was positive for VZV; cerebrospinal fluid cultures and blood cultures were negative. The patient had complete resolution of symptoms with no complications on intravenous acyclovir therapy and was discharged home on oral valacyclovir therapy. Conclusion. It is important to consider varicella zoster virus as an etiology of aseptic meningitis as clinical presentation can be without a vesicular rash and in immunocompetent patients.

Case Report

Lactococcus lactis Endocarditis in an Immunocompromised Patient

Lactococcus lactis infections are rarely reported in the medical literature. L. lactis is a commonly used fermenting agent which may be difficult to identify with common microbiology identification processes. This factor may contribute to its lack of recognition in medical journals. We report a case of an immunosuppressed 80-year-old female with L. lactis bacteremia, subsequently, found to have aortic valve vegetation, who responded clinically to a six-week duration of ceftriaxone therapy. Afterward, a brief updated literature review is presented on L. lactis infections.

Case Report

Peritoneal and Pulmonary Tuberculosis in a Postpartum Female with Elevated Cancer Antigen 125 and Ascites

Background. Peritoneal tuberculosis is a rare form of extrapulmonary tuberculosis and presents a challenging diagnosis because of its nonspecific clinical manifestations. Peritoneal TB mimics other pathologies, including abdominal carcinomatosis, especially when the patient presents with ascites and an elevated cancer antigen (CA)-125 levels. Case Presentation. A postpartum 20-year-old Hispanic female recently discharged after transverse cesarean surgery, presented to the ER with fever, chills, edema, abdominal distension, nausea, and vomiting. The patient was febrile, tachycardic, and hypotensive. Chest X-ray demonstrated alveolar and interstitial consolidations; chest CT revealed tree-in-bud opacities in the right lower lobe, suggestive of atypical (TB)/fungal infection. CT of the abdomen and pelvis demonstrated ascites, omental thickening, peritoneal thickening, and mesenteric adenopathy, suggestive of carcinomatosis. She was admitted with a presumed diagnosis of sepsis secondary to pneumonia and started empirically on broad-spectrum antibiotics without clinical improvement. A battery of oncology markers was ordered and revealed a mildly elevated cancer antigen (CA)-125. Diagnostic paracentesis showed lymphocytic predominance with positive mycobacteria PCR, elevated adenosine deaminase (ADA), and no malignant cells. Subsequently, the sputum acid-fast bacilli (AFB) stain returned positive for tuberculosis, confirming the diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis. A peritoneal biopsy was obtained and demonstrated caseating granulomas consistent with peritoneal tuberculosis. The patient was started on standard antituberculosis therapy with clinical improvement. Conclusions. This case highlights the need for a high-level of suspicion for peritoneal tuberculosis in a patient with pulmonary tuberculosis who presents with intra-abdominal ascites, omental thickening, peritoneal thickening, and mesenteric lymphadenopathy, despite the presence of an elevated CA-125 level.

Case Report

Cellulitis Caused by Hirudo orientalis Bites That Lead to an Allergic reaction

The allergic reaction due to leech bites is frequently reported due to complications of leech therapy and also unwanted leech infestation. Regularly, the urticarial papules are common, and itching lasts less than 24 h. In the case of leech biting, dermal infection could be caused by leech gut bacterial flora such as Aeromonas spp and histamine from leech saliva. In this case report, a 30-year-old diabetic woman, who works in the field of leech breeding, was bitten by Hirudo orientalis during breeding. Her clinical signs were inflammation, swelling, pain, and redness in the back of her left hand. A microbiological examination revealed that the isolated leech was infected with Aeromona hydrophila. The risk of death due to anaphylactic shock and sepsis is high in some cases of underlying diabetes and immunocompromised individuals. The study pointed out the hazards of leech bites and proposed preventative measures such as using gloves and boots for farm workers.

Case Reports in Infectious Diseases
 Journal metrics
See full report
Acceptance rate34%
Submission to final decision103 days
Acceptance to publication17 days
CiteScore-
Journal Citation Indicator0.180
Impact Factor-
 Submit

Article of the Year Award: Outstanding research contributions of 2021, as selected by our Chief Editors. Read the winning articles.