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Case Reports in Infectious Diseases
Volume 2015, Article ID 723726, 4 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/723726
Case Report

Diagnostic Challenges of Tuberculous Lymphadenitis Using Polymerase Chain Reaction Analysis: A Case Study

1The Department of Internal Medicine, Toyama Prefectural Central Hospital, Toyama, Toyama 930-8550, Japan
2The Division of Microbiology, Department of Medical Laboratory, Toyama Prefectural Central Hospital, Toyama, Toyama 930-8550, Japan
3The Department of Otolaryngology, Toyama Prefectural Central Hospital, Toyama, Toyama 930-8550, Japan
4The Department of Pathology, Toyama Prefectural Central Hospital, Toyama, Toyama 930-8550, Japan
5The Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Toyama Prefectural Central Hospital, Toyama, Toyama 930-8550, Japan

Received 24 August 2014; Revised 3 January 2015; Accepted 7 January 2015

Academic Editor: Daniela M. Cirillo

Copyright © 2015 Hirokazu Taniguchi et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

This report presents a case of tuberculous lymphadenitis that was difficult to diagnose using polymerase chain reaction analysis. An 80-year-old Japanese female was hospitalized due to swollen cervical lymph nodes. Her lymph node tests revealed paradoxical polymerase chain reaction results. Polymerase chain reaction analysis of two biopsy tissues using the Cobas TaqMan revealed a positive result for Mycobacterium avium and a negative result for Mycobacterium tuberculosis. However, polymerase chain reaction analysis of a cultured colony of acid-fast bacteria from biopsy tissue using the Cobas TaqMan and an alternative polymerase chain reaction analysis of biopsy tissue yielded discordant results. The patient was diagnosed as having tuberculous lymphadenitis. She was treated with antitubercular drugs and subsequently had a reduction in cervical lymph node swelling. Polymerase chain reaction analysis is not 100% accurate; hence, its use as a diagnostic tool for mycobacterial infection requires increased attention.