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Case Reports in Infectious Diseases
Volume 2016 (2016), Article ID 8280915, 4 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/8280915
Case Report

Cryptococcus gattii in an Immunocompetent Patient in the Southeastern United States

1Department of Neurosurgery, University of Alabama at Birmingham, School of Medicine, Birmingham, AL, USA
2School of Medicine, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL, USA
3Department of Veterans Affairs, Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Birmingham, AL, USA

Received 11 August 2016; Accepted 26 October 2016

Academic Editor: Paola Di Carlo

Copyright © 2016 John W. Amburgy et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Linked References

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