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Case Reports in Infectious Diseases
Volume 2017 (2017), Article ID 1972587, 8 pages
Case Report

Imported Asymptomatic Bancroftian Filariasis Discovered from a Plasmodium vivax Infected Patient: A Case Report from Singapore

1Malaria Reference Centre, National Public Health Laboratory, Ministry of Health, 3 Biopolis Drive, Synapse 05-14/16, Singapore 138623
2Department of Laboratory Medicine, National University Hospital, 5 Lower Kent Ridge Road, Singapore 119074

Correspondence should be addressed to Jean-Marc Chavatte

Received 17 April 2017; Accepted 1 June 2017; Published 18 July 2017

Academic Editor: Paul Horrocks

Copyright © 2017 Jean-Marc Chavatte and Roland Jureen. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.


Human lymphatic filariasis is a vector-borne disease mainly caused by the parasitic nematode Wuchereria bancrofti and transmitted worldwide within the tropical and subtropical regions. Singapore was once endemic for bancroftian filariasis but recent reports are scarce and the disease is nearly forgotten. The case report presented here reports the incidental hospital laboratory finding of an asymptomatic microfilaremia in a relapsing Plasmodium vivax imported case during a malaria treatment follow-up appointment. The parasite was identified by microscopy as W. bancrofti and retrospective investigation of the sample collected during malaria onset was found to be also positive. Additional confirmation was obtained by DNA amplification, sequencing, and phylogenetic analysis of the mitochondrial cox1 gene that further related the parasite to W. bancrofti strains from the Indian region. Considering the large proportion of asymptomatic filariasis with microfilaremia, the high number of migrants and travellers arriving from the surrounding endemic countries, and the common presence of local competent mosquito vectors, Singapore remains vulnerable to the introduction, reemergence, and the spread of lymphatic filariasis. This report brings out from the shadow the potential risk of lymphatic filariasis in Singapore and could help to maintain awareness about this parasitic disease and its public health importance.