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Case Reports in Infectious Diseases
Volume 2017 (2017), Article ID 4181582, 3 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/4181582
Case Report

Is It Necessary to Specifically Define the Cause of Surgically Treated Biliary Tract Infections? A Rare Case of Raoultella planticola Cholecystitis and Literature Review

1Kanuni Sultan Suleyman Training and Research Hospital, Department of General Surgery, Istanbul, Turkey
2Kanuni Sultan Suleyman Training and Research Hospital, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Istanbul, Turkey

Correspondence should be addressed to ─░nanc Samil Sarici

Received 18 October 2016; Revised 9 February 2017; Accepted 16 February 2017; Published 7 May 2017

Academic Editor: Alexandre Rodrigues Marra

Copyright © 2017 Suat Can Ulukent et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Raoultella planticola is an aquatic and soil organism that does not notoriously cause invasive infections in humans. Infections in the literature are limited only in case reports. We present a very rare case of R. planticola cholecystitis. A 71-year-old female patient with abdominal pain was diagnosed with acute cholecystitis. Patient received intravenous antibiotic treatment, but the treatment failed and the patient underwent an open cholecystectomy. The final pathological result was gangrenous cholecystitis complicated with R. planticola. Eventually, the patient recovered with appropriate antimicrobial therapy. Patients with acute cholecystitis are usually treated without any microbiological sampling and antibiotic treatment is started empirically. To date, there have only been 5 reported biliary system related R. planticola infections in humans. We believe that Raoultella species might be a more frequent agent than usually thought, especially in resistant cholecystitis cases. Resistant strains should be considered as a possible causative organism when the patient’s condition worsened despite proper antimicrobial therapy. It should be considered safe to send microbiological samples for culture and specifically define the causative microorganisms even in the setting of a cholecystectomized patient.