Table of Contents Author Guidelines Submit a Manuscript
Case Reports in Infectious Diseases
Volume 2017, Article ID 4839314, 4 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/4839314
Case Report

Exophiala (Wangiella) dermatitidis Prosthetic Aortic Valve Endocarditis and Prosthetic Graft Infection in an Immune Competent Patient

1Department of Anesthesiology, Division of Critical Care Medicine, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, NY, USA
2Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, NY, USA
3Department of Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, NY, USA
4Division of Infectious Diseases, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, NY, USA

Correspondence should be addressed to Uzma N. Sarwar; gro.eroifetnom@rawrasu

Received 25 October 2016; Revised 2 March 2017; Accepted 21 March 2017; Published 18 April 2017

Academic Editor: Sinésio Talhari

Copyright © 2017 Jay S. Berger et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Linked References

  1. J. E. Bennett, R. Dolin, and M. J. Blaser, Mandell, Douglas, and Bennett's Principles and Practice of Infectious Diseases: Expert Consult Premium Edition, Elsevier—Health Sciences Division, 2014.
  2. D. Alabaz, F. Kibar, S. Arikan et al., “Systemic phaeohyphomycosis due to Exophiala (Wangiella) in an immunocompetent child,” Medical Mycology, vol. 47, no. 6, pp. 653–657, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  3. S. G. Revankar and D. A. Sutton, “Melanized fungi in human disease,” Clinical Microbiology Reviews, vol. 23, no. 4, pp. 884–928, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  4. J. Zupančič, M. N. Babič, P. Zalar, and N. Gunde-Cimerman, “The black yeast Exophiala dermatitidis and other selected opportunistic human fungal pathogens spread from dishwashers to kitchens,” PLoS ONE, vol. 11, no. 2, Article ID e0148166, 2016. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  5. A. Döğen, E. Kaplan, Z. Öksüz, M. S. Serin, M. Ilkit, and G. S. De Hoog, “Dishwashers are a major source of human opportunistic yeast-like fungi in indoor environments in Mersin, Turkey,” Medical Mycology, vol. 51, no. 5, pp. 493–498, 2013. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  6. T. T. Matsumoto, T. Matsuda, M. R. McGinnis, and L. Ajello, “Clinical and mycological spectra of Wangiella dermatitidis infections,” Mycoses, vol. 36, no. 5-6, pp. 145–155, 1993. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  7. D.-M. Li, R.-Y. Li, G. S. de Hoog, M. Sudhadham, and D.-L. Wang, “Fatal Exophiala infections in China, with a report of seven cases,” Mycoses, vol. 54, no. 4, pp. e136–e142, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  8. A. K. Patel, K. K. Patel, P. Darji, R. Singh, M. R. Shivaprakash, and A. Chakrabarti, “Exophiala dermatitidis endocarditis on native aortic valve in a postrenal transplant patient and review of literature on E. dermatitidis infections,” Mycoses, vol. 56, no. 3, pp. 365–372, 2013. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  9. C. V. Vartian, D. M. Shlaes, A. A. Padhye, and L. Ajello, “Wangiella dermatitidis endocarditis in an intravenous drug user,” The American Journal of Medicine, vol. 78, no. 4, pp. 703–707, 1985. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  10. E. E. Stefaniuk, A. Baraniak, M. Gniadkowski, and W. Hryniewicz, “Evaluation of the BD phoenix automated identification and susceptibility testing system in clinical microbiology laboratory practice,” European Journal of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, vol. 22, no. 8, pp. 479–485, 2003. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  11. M. A. Highland, S. Chaturvedi, M. Perez, H. Steinberg, and R. Wallace, “Histologic and molecular identification of disseminated histoplasma capsulatum in a captive brown bear (ursus arctos),” Journal of Veterinary Diagnostic Investigation, vol. 23, no. 4, pp. 764–769, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  12. A. Espinel-Ingroff, A. Fothergill, M. Ghannoum et al., “Quality control and reference guidelines for CLSI broth microdilution susceptibility method (M38-A document) for amphotericin B, itraconazole, posaconazole, and voriconazole,” Journal of Clinical Microbiology, vol. 43, no. 10, pp. 5243–5246, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  13. M. E. M. Ellis, H. Al-Abdely, A. Sandridge, W. Greer, and W. Ventura, “Fungal endocarditis: evidence in the world literature, 1965–1995,” Clinical Infectious Diseases, vol. 32, no. 1, pp. 50–62, 2001. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  14. E. Rubinstein and R. Lang, “Fungal endocarditis,” European Heart Journal, vol. 16, pp. 84–89, 1995. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  15. D. M. Li and G. S. de Hoog, “Cerebral phaeohyphomycosis-a cure at what lengths?” The Lancet Infectious Diseases, vol. 9, no. 6, pp. 376–383, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  16. S. Chalkias, C. D. Alonso, J. D. Levine, and M. T. Wong, “Emerging pathogen in immunocompromised hosts: exophiala dermatitidis mycosis in graft-versus-host disease,” Transplant Infectious Disease, vol. 16, no. 4, pp. 616–620, 2014. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus