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Case Reports in Infectious Diseases
Volume 2018, Article ID 3685439, 4 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2018/3685439
Case Report

Intestinal Myiasis Caused by Sarcophaga spp. in Cusco, Peru: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

1School of Medicine, University of Texas Medical Branch, 301 University Boulevard, Galveston, TX 77555, USA
2Cusco Branch, Tropical Medicine Institute, Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia, Calle Jose Carlos Mariategui J-6, Wanchaq, Cusco, Peru
3Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Texas Medical Branch, 301 University Boulevard, Galveston, TX 77555, USA
4Department of Pathology, University of Texas Medical Branch, 301 University Boulevard, Galveston, TX 77555, USA
5Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Texas Medical Branch, 301 University Boulevard RT 0435, Galveston, TX 77555, USA

Correspondence should be addressed to Miguel Mauricio Cabada; ude.bmtu@adabacim

Received 12 March 2018; Accepted 6 May 2018; Published 27 May 2018

Academic Editor: Larry M. Bush

Copyright © 2018 Priscilla Ly et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Myiasis is the infestation by dipterous fly larvae in humans and animals. The larvae can infect living or necrotic tissue involving the skin, nasopharynx, genitourinary, and gastrointestinal tracts. The accidental ingestion of eggs causes infection of the intestinal tract. We report a case of intestinal myiasis caused by Sarcophaga spp. larvae in a two-year-old child from Limatambo province in the Cusco region of Peru. Live larvae were identified incidentally in this child’s stool sample during the study screening for Strongyloides stercoralis. The child did not have any constitutional or abdominal symptoms. The morphological examination of the specimen under magnification revealed Sarcophaga spp. larvae. We performed a literature review of publications reporting intestinal myiasis caused by Sarcophaga spp. and discussed key aspects of this infestation.