Case Reports in Medicine
 Journal metrics
Acceptance rate32%
Submission to final decision58 days
Acceptance to publication23 days
CiteScore1.100
Impact Factor-

Pseudothrombocytopenia Inducing Nonindicated Platelet Transfusion after Cardiac Surgery

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Case Reports in Medicine publishes case reports and case series in all areas of clinical medicine.

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Case Reports in Medicine maintains an Editorial Board of practicing researchers from around the world, to ensure manuscripts are handled by editors who are experts in the field of study.

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Case Report

Diagnosis of Hodgkin’s Lymphoma Using Endobronchial Ultrasound-Guided Transbronchial Needle

Endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial biopsy has emerged as an excellent tool in diagnosing lung cancer. However, its use to diagnose lymphoma has been questioned, since the gold standard for diagnosing lymphomas is an excisional biopsy of involved lymph nodes. However, the procedure is sometimes risky or difficult. Recent studies have been showing great results using endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration when accompanied by immunohistochemistry and cytology. Here, we present a case of Hodgkin’s lymphoma patient that was accurately diagnosed using endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration.

Case Report

Worsening of Retinal Detachment after Cataract Surgery in the Eye with Persistent Fetal Vasculature

Purpose. To report a case of persistent fetal vasculature (PFV) with a retinal detachment that worsened after cataract surgery. Pars plana vitrectomy (PPV) was performed which reduced the vitreous traction and reattached the retina. Observations. A 20-year-old Myanmarese woman presented with a mature cataract, and her vision was light perception. She underwent uneventful cataract surgery with implantation of an intraocular lens. Her visual acuity improved to 20/200 immediately after the surgery. However, fibrotic tissue was observed between the optic nerve head and the posterior capsule. She was diagnosed with PFV, and she was followed without any intervention. One and a half years after the cataract surgery, she had an advanced retinal detachment which extended over the inferior two quadrants. Her vision deteriorated to 20/400. She underwent PPV, and the PFV tissue was removed which resulted in the reattachment of the retina. The visual acuity improved to 20/60. Conclusions. Surgeons should be aware that it is possible to worsen a retinal detachment after cataract surgery in the eyes with PFV. A simple technique to release the anterior-posterior traction by the PPV was sufficient to achieve the reattachment of the retina.

Case Report

Scrotal Verrucous Carcinoma: An Exceptional Localization of a Rare Tumor

Scrotal verrucous carcinoma is a rare entity. It is rarely metastatic especially in lymph nodes. Imaging is important for local extension in order to guide the surgical procedure. The diagnostic is histological. The treatment is based on surgical excision. The prognosis is relatively good, but local recurrences are frequent. We report a case of scrotal verrucous carcinoma in a 49-year-old man evolving for 1 year.

Case Report

Brachial Artery Thrombosis following Multiple Wasp Bites

Wasp bites can give rise to multiple clinical manifestations ranging from local reactions to multisystem involvement. Stroke and myocardial infarctions following wasp envenomation are reported in the literature. We describe a rare case of brachial artery thrombosis following multiple wasp bites.

Case Report

Atypical Presentation of Pediatric Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Complicated by Cryptococcal Meningitis

Background. Cryptococcus is an opportunistic fungal pathogen that leads to life-threatening infections. Cryptococcal infections are mainly reported in HIV patients and less commonly encountered in non-HIV immunocompromised host. Cryptococcus neoformans (C. neoformans) is the most common Cryptococcus species causing diseases in humans which can be presented as pulmonary, meningitis, cutaneous, and/or disseminated cryptococcosis. Case Presentation. A 12-year-old female girl from Cairo, Egypt, presented to the pediatric hospital with signs of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). She had an aggressive lupus nephritis course for which corticosteroids, mycophenolate mofetil, and cyclophosphamide were prescribed, and the child gradually improved and was discharged. Two months later, the patient exhibited skin lesions involved both in her legs, massive ulcers were developed and extended rapidly through the entire legs followed by deterioration in her conscious level, and signs of meningitis were documented. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) examination and microbiological workup were confirmatory for C. neoformans infection, and mental and motor functions were rapidly deteriorated. Treatment with amphotericin B in addition to supportive treatment and close follow-up of the patient’s medical condition result in obvious clinical improvement and patient discharge with minimal residual weakness in her legs after almost a one-month duration. After six months, the patient was brought to the emergency department complaining of repeated attacks of seizures, a lumbar puncture was performed, and culture results were again confirmatory for C. neoformans. An intensive course of antifungal therapy was prescribed which was successful, evident by resolution of the signs and symptoms of infection in addition to negative culture results and negative sepsis biomarkers. The child clinically improved, but unfortunately, gradual optic nerve degeneration and brain cell atrophy as a sequel of severe and longstanding cryptococcal infection resulted in her death after almost one year from her first attack. Conclusion. Cryptococcal infection among non-HIV patients is a rare disease but can result in advanced medical complications which may be fatal. The disease should be suspected to be reliably diagnosed. Cryptococcus infection can be presented as a skin lesion which, if not treated properly at an earlier time, can result in dissemination and life-threatening consequences. Amphotericin B can be used effectively in cryptococcosis management in the settings where flucytosine is not available. Signs of cryptococcal meningitis can be manifested again after a period of remission and clinical cure which signifies the latency of Cryptococcus in the central nervous system. The second activation of Cryptococcus after its latency is usually life-threatening and mostly fatal.

Case Report

Pelvic Pain and Adnexal Mass: Be Aware of Accessory and Cavitated Uterine Mass

Accessory and cavitated uterine mass (ACUM) is a rare form of Mullerian anomaly that usually presents in young females with chronic cyclic pelvic pain and/or dysmenorrhea. This clinical entity is often underdiagnosed as it may be mistaken for other differential diagnoses, such as pedunculated myoma or adnexal lesions. Imaging modalities, including ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), accompanied with relevant and suspicious clinical findings are important tools in making acorrect diagnosis. To date, surgical excision of the mass remains the mainstay of treatment,which provides significant symptom relief. In this study, we present a female adolescent with chronic pelvic pain since menarche who underwent laparotomy with the presumed diagnosis of a left-sided ovarian mass. Retrospective evaluation of pelvic MR images demonstrated that the lesion was in fact an ACUM, which was further confirmed by histopathological examination.

Case Reports in Medicine
 Journal metrics
Acceptance rate32%
Submission to final decision58 days
Acceptance to publication23 days
CiteScore1.100
Impact Factor-
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