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Case Reports in Medicine
Volume 2011, Article ID 183050, 3 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/183050
Case Report

Normal Coronary Artery Patient Presenting with Left Ventricular Aneurysm

1Department of Cardiology, Baskent University School of Medicine, Adana Hospital, Adana, Turkey
2Department of Cardiology, Baskent University School of Medicine, Ankara Hospital, Ankara, Turkey

Received 13 February 2011; Revised 20 April 2011; Accepted 15 May 2011

Academic Editor: Michael S. Firstenberg

Copyright © 2011 Hakan Altay et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Left ventricular aneurysm (LVA) is one of the most important complications of myocardial infarction LVA is strictly defined as a distinct area of abnormal left ventricular diastolic contour with systolic dyskinesia or paradoxical bulging. LVA usually results from myocardial infarction. Other rare aetiologies of LVA include hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, Chagas' disease, sarcoidosis, congenital LVA, and idiopathic However, LVA formation in patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy is rarely reported, and the incidence, clinical features, and pathogenesis of LVA formation in patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy is not well understood. Here, we present a 45 years old, idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy patient with LVA and normal coronary arteries The pathogenesis of LVA formation in patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy is not clear. One acceptable hypothesis is that coronary artery emboli originate from mural thrombi, present in some patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy, which develop due to local wall infarction and fibrosis. The local myocardial perfusion differences could be seen in idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy and predominantly found in the anteroposterior axis of the left ventricle. Local fibrosis occurs more frequently on the anterior wall or posterior wall, and less frequently on the lateral or septal wall. In our patient, LVA existed in the septal segments.We could not define the exact mechanism of the septal aneurysm in our patient but we decided to present this abnormal case, which is different from cases thus far reported in the literature.