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Case Reports in Medicine
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 858672, 3 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/858672
Case Report

Acute Abdomen in a Patient with Cancer Pain on Oxycodone

1Department of Otolaryngology, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo 113-8519, Japan
2Head and Neck Surgery, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo 113-8519, Japan
3ER Center, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo 113-8519, Japan

Received 10 August 2011; Revised 25 September 2011; Accepted 25 September 2011

Academic Editor: Michael G. Irwin

Copyright © 2011 Naomi Kishine et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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