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Case Reports in Medicine
Volume 2012, Article ID 319530, 3 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/319530
Case Report

Myeloma as a Second Malignancy following AML: Is a Second Allo Equivalent to Auto?

1Stem Cell Transplantation Unit, Hematology Department, Ankara University Medical School, Dikimevi, 06590 Ankara, Turkey
2Tissue Typing Laboratory, Stem Cell Transplantation Unit, Hematology Department, Ankara University Medical School, Dikimevi, 06590 Ankara, Turkey
3Department of Pathology, Ankara University Medical School, Dikimevi, 06590 Ankara, Turkey

Received 30 April 2012; Accepted 31 May 2012

Academic Editor: Thomas R. Chauncey

Copyright © 2012 Sule Mine Bakanay et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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