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Case Reports in Medicine
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 149656, 4 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/149656
Case Report

A Case with Mega Cisterna Magna Renal and Ear Anomalies: Is This a New Syndrome?

1Adiyaman Medical Faculty, Pediatrics Department, 02100 Adiyaman, Turkey
2Batman Kozluk State Hospital, Batman, Turkey
3Dicle Medical Faculty, Pediatrics Department, Diyarbakir, Turkey

Received 11 October 2012; Revised 26 February 2013; Accepted 25 April 2013

Academic Editor: Thomas Vogl

Copyright © 2013 Çapan Konca et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Background. Extrarenal pathologies may be associated with renal position and fusion anomalies. According to the literature, our patient is the first horseshoe kidney case that had mega cisterna magna, arachnodactyly, and mild mental retardation. Case Report. A 9-year-old boy admitted because of the myoclonic jerks. He had a dysmorphic face, low-set and cup-shaped ears, arachnodactyly, and mild mental retardation. The patient’s laboratory findings were normal except for a mild leucocytosis and hypochromic microcytic anemia. His cerebrospinal fluid was cytologically and biochemically normal. Cranial MRI revealed 1.5 cm diametered mega cisterna magna in the retrocerebellar region. Although there were no significant epileptical discharges in the electroencephalography, there were slow wave discharges arising from the anterior regions of both hemispheres. Because he had stomachache, abdominal ultrasonography was performed, and horseshoe kidney was determined. Abdominal CT did not reveal any abnormalities except the horseshoe kidney. There were not any cardiac pathologies in echocardiography. He had normal 46XY karyotype and there were no repeated chromosomal derangements, but we could not evaluate for molecular and submicroscopic somatic changes. He was treated with valproic acid and myoclonic jerks did not repeat. Conclusion. We suggest that the presence of these novel findings may represent a newly recognized, separate syndrome.