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Case Reports in Medicine
Volume 2013, Article ID 610726, 4 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/610726
Case Report

Exercise-Induced Anaphylaxis: A Case Report and Review of the Diagnosis and Treatment of a Rare but Potentially Life-Threatening Syndrome

1Department of Internal Medicine, Tripler Army Medical Center, 1 Jarrett White Road, Honolulu, HI 96859, USA
2Department of Allergy and Immunology, Tripler Army Medical Center, 1 Jarrett White Road, Honolulu, HI 96859, USA

Received 7 December 2012; Accepted 7 March 2013

Academic Editor: Ting Fan Leung

Copyright © 2013 Nathan T. Jaqua et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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