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Case Reports in Medicine
Volume 2014, Article ID 247286, 4 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/247286
Case Report

Coexisting Mantle Cell Lymphoma and Prostate Adenocarcinoma

1Division of Hematopathology, The Ottawa Hospital, General Campus, 501 Smyth Road, Ottawa, ON, Canada K1H 8L6
2Eastern Ontario Regional Laboratory Association and The Ottawa Hospital, General Campus, 501 Smyth Road, Ottawa, ON, Canada K1H 8L6
3Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Division of Hematopathology and Transfusion Medicine, The Ottawa Hospital, General Campus, 501 Smyth Road, Ottawa, ON, Canada K1H 8L6
4Division of Anatomical Pathology, The Ottawa Hospital, General Campus, 501 Smyth Road, Ottawa, ON, Canada K1H 8L6
5Division of Urology, The Ottawa Hospital, Civic Campus, 1053 Carling Avenue, Ottawa, ON, Canada K1Y 4E9
6Division of Hematology, The Ottawa Hospital, General Campus, 501 Smyth Road, Ottawa, ON, Canada K1H 8L6

Received 19 August 2014; Accepted 3 October 2014; Published 16 October 2014

Academic Editor: Thomas R. Chauncey

Copyright © 2014 Ashish B. Rajput et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Prostatic mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) is a very rare entity with only 5 reported cases in the literature. We report a case of coexisting MCL and prostate adenocarcinoma (PCa) in an elderly male and review the morphologic features of classic and rare prostatic MCL subtypes. Careful morphologic evaluation and immunohistochemical findings of positive CD5, CD20, and cyclin D1 and negative CD23 and CD3 can guide us to the diagnosis of MCL. Given the fact that transurethral resection of prostate is done quite routinely, this paper draws attention to the manner in which long standing bladder outlet obstruction and postbiopsy prostate specimens with dense lymphoid infiltration can masquerade as lymphoma. It highlights the importance of exercising care while reviewing prostate specimens with evidence of chronic prostatitis so as not to miss this rare neoplasm.