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Case Reports in Medicine
Volume 2017, Article ID 2432315, 5 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/2432315
Case Report

An Undiagnosed Case of Hypothalamic Hamartoma with a Rare Presentation

1Isfahan Neurosciences Research Center, Department of Neurology, School of Medicine, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran
2Department of Neurology, Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences, Mazandaran, Iran
3Department of Neurosurgery, School of Medicine, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran
4Kashani Comprehensive Epilepsy Center, Kashani Hospital, School of Medicine, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran
5Psychosomatic Research Center, Department of Psychiatry, School of Medicine, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran
6Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran
7Shefa Neuroscience Research Center, Tehran, Iran
8Students’ Research Center, School of Medicine, Shahrekord University of Medical Sciences, Shahrekord, Iran
9Department of Neurology, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, TN, USA

Correspondence should be addressed to Jafar Mehvari Habibabadi; moc.liamtoh@iravhem.rd

Received 13 July 2016; Revised 5 December 2016; Accepted 22 December 2016; Published 26 January 2017

Academic Editor: Malcolm E. Molyneux

Copyright © 2017 Shervin Badihian et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Background. Hypothalamic hamartomas (HHs) are rare tumor-like malformations that may present with complex partial seizures refractory to anticonvulsants in adulthood. The condition may be misdiagnosed because of rarity. Case Presentation. We report a 25-year-old man with complaint of seizures presented by falling, tonic spasm of limbs, oral automatism, vocalization, and hypermotor activities. His seizures started at the age of one month and presented as eye deviation and upper limbs myoclonic jerk, followed by frequent seizures with variable frequency. The patient had delayed developmental milestones and was mentally retarded. He was hospitalized and underwent video-EEG monitoring and neuroimaging, and the diagnosis of HH was made. The patient became candidate for surgery after that. Conclusion. In this case, the underlying etiology of seizures was diagnosed after 25 years. HH is a rare condition and neurologists may encounter very small number of these cases during their practice. Therefore, they should consider it in patients who present with suspected signs and symptoms.