Case Reports in Nephrology
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Acceptance rate33%
Submission to final decision77 days
Acceptance to publication13 days
CiteScore0.800
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Crescentic Glomerulonephritis and Membranous Nephropathy: A Rare Overlap

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Case Reports in Nephrology publishes case reports and case series focusing on the prevention, diagnosis, and management of kidney diseases and associated disorders, including cancer. The journal also focuses on advances in transplantation techniques.

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Case Reports in Nephrology maintains an Editorial Board of practicing researchers from around the world, to ensure manuscripts are handled by editors who are experts in the field of study.

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Case Report

Calciphylaxis: A Long Road to Cure with a Multidisciplinary and Multimodal Approach

Calciphylaxis is a rare yet potentially fatal condition, resulting from ectopic calcification of the small arterioles of the dermis with resulting necrotic lesions infection, sepsis, and death. In hemodialysis patients, its prevalence ranges between 1 and 4%, while mortality amounts to 30–80%. We present in here a 45-year-old female on chronic dialysis with morbid obesity, who was admitted for painful nodules in the lower abdomen and necrotic lesions at the lower extremities. Severe uremia and uncontrolled secondary hyperparathyroidism were the main characteristics in this patient, and thus, a clinical diagnosis of calciphylaxis was made. Treatment modalities included wound care plus antibiotics and analgesics, daily hemodialysis, and strategies targeting calcification with sodium thiosulfate, cinacalcet, and non-calcium-containing binders. A crucial factor for overcoming the infection-lesion vicious circle is thorough and daily care of the lesions. Nursing attention was focused on the motivation of her self-care, for the prevention of institutionalization and the psychological support of the patient and her family. The most intriguing feature was the fact that she experienced several exacerbations during the follow-up time. During the final relapse, she was prescribed hyperbaric oxygen sessions that actually put the disease under control thereafter. The good outcome for this patient was probably related to the combination of close follow-up along with a multidisciplinary approach.

Case Report

An Unusual Case of Kidney Injury in a Young Woman with a Connective Tissue Disease

A 32-year-old female was admitted to our institution with thrombocytopenia, fever, serositis, hepatosplenomegaly, diffuse lymphadenopathy, and renal insufficiency. A diagnosis of systemic lupus erythematosus was made. Due to recalcitrant thrombocytopenia, serositis, and renal insufficiency methylprednisolone was prescribed in high doses. In addition to proteinuria and hematuria, she was found to have uric acid crystals in her urinalysis. A serum uric acid was found elevated at 18 mg/dL. Rasburicase infusions were started. Within 5 days of commencing rasburicase and continuing high-dose methylprednisolone, her serum creatinine normalized and proteinuria resolved. The microhematuria disappeared within 2 weeks of beginning rasburicase. The rapid reversal of renal insufficiency and all urinary abnormalities after the start of rasburicase infusions suggests that the renal injury was most likely due to uric acid-mediated renal injury and not lupus nephritis. Our case illustrates the co-occurrence of 2 distinct clinical entities, one common for the patient’s age, sex, and foremost clinical findings, while the other uncommon and unexpected, but both associated to kidney injury. Clinicians must be aware that careful evaluation of symptoms and laboratory tests is needed to make a thorough differential diagnosis and provide the right treatment at the most opportune moment.

Case Report

ANCA-Negative Vasculitis in Eosinophilic Granulomatosis with Polyangiitis Complicated with Membranous Nephropathy: A Case Report and Brief Literature Review

Renal involvement in eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis (EGPA) typically occurs in anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibody (ANCA)-positive cases presenting with rapidly progressive renal insufficiency and urinary abnormalities induced by primarily necrotizing crescentic glomerulonephritis (NCGN). Recently, ANCA-negative EGPA has also been reported to manifest with renal involvement, such as NCGN or non-NCGN, including membranous nephropathy (MN). Herein, we report a 70-year-old female who presented with purpura on the lower legs, upper limb numbness, renal dysfunction (eGFR, 20.5 ml/min/1.73 m2), and eosinophilia (eosinophils, 37,570/μl). MPO-and PR3-ANCA were negative, and urinalysis revealed urine protein (0.63 g/day) but without red blood cells in the urine sediment. Thus, she was diagnosed with ANCA-negative EGPA with rapidly progressive renal dysfunction. A renal biopsy revealed vasculitis in the interlobular arteries without NCGN, with the vasculitis being complicated by MN. Micrograph findings on fluorescence immunostaining contained both primary and secondary characteristics of MN (dominance of IgG subclass 4 more than subclass 1 vs. negativity of PLA2R and THSD7A). After treatment with prednisolone, her eosinophil counts normalized, and renal dysfunction improved. Furthermore, urine protein did not increase above 1.0 g/day during the clinical course. This is a rare case of ANCA-negative EGPA presenting with acute renal dysfunction without NCGN and subclinical MN with unknown etiology. It is important to recognize that EGPA pathology varies widely throughout the disease course, and the clinical course of subclinical MN should be carefully assessed in further follow-ups.

Case Series

Exacerbation of Congenital Hydronephrosis as the First Presentation of COVID-19 Infection in Children

Background. Congenital hydronephrosis is one of the most common abnormalities of the upper urinary tract, which can be exacerbated by a variety of intrinsic or extrinsic triggers. The urinary tract system is one of the major organs complicated by COVID-19 infection. Case Presentations. Here, we report five patients with an established diagnosis of congenital hydronephrosis, who presented with acute abdominal pain and fever and an abrupt increase in the anteroposterior pelvic diameter (APD). Patients had a previous stable course and were under regular follow-up with serial ultrasonographic studies. They underwent surgery or supportive treatment due to the later exacerbation of hydronephrosis. Based on the clinical and imaging findings, no plausible etiologies for these exacerbation episodes, including infection, nephrolithiasis, or abdominal masses, could be postulated. The common aspect in all these patients was the evidence of a COVID-19 infection. Conclusions. Infection with COVID-19 in children with antenatal hydronephrosis may exacerbate the degree of hydronephrosis and renal APD in ultrasonography, which itself may be mediated by the increase in inflammatory mediators.

Case Report

Beer Potomania: Why Initial Fluid Resuscitation May Be Harmful

Beer potomania is one of the less common causes of hyponatremia that we encounter. Patients usually have a recent history of binge drinking along with poor diet. The low solute content in alcoholic beverages limits daily urine output, and ingestion of extra fluid will cause dilutional hyponatremia as a result. Blindly providing intravenous fluid without an underlying cause of the hyponatremia can be detrimental, such as in patients with beer potomania. In our case, a patient presented to the emergency department due to poor oral intake from jaw pain and was found to be hyponatremic from alcohol intake. He initially received 2 liters of fluid, which caused overcorrection of his sodium, requiring more free water to lower his sodium as a result.

Case Report

Hypercalcemia, Acute Kidney Injury, and Metabolic Alkalosis

Calcium regulation is tightly controlled in the body. Multiple causes of hypercalcemia have been studied including primary hyperparathyroidism, hypercalcemia of malignancy, and chronic granulomatous disorders. Among the less studied causes is calcium-alkali syndrome. Here, we discuss a case of hypercalcemia secondary to calcium-alkali syndrome, presenting with hypercalcemia, metabolic alkalosis, and acute kidney injury as a result of ingestion of a large amount of calcium supplements. Hypercalcemia can result in impaired collecting duct system sensitivity to antidiuretic hormone, afferent arteriole constriction, and activation of calcium sensor receptors in multiple tissues. The net effect is an increase in calcium reabsorption with a salt and water diuresis which leads to volume depletion, acute kidney injury, and metabolic alkalosis.

Case Reports in Nephrology
 Journal metrics
See full report
Acceptance rate33%
Submission to final decision77 days
Acceptance to publication13 days
CiteScore0.800
Journal Citation Indicator-
Impact Factor-
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Article of the Year Award: Outstanding research contributions of 2021, as selected by our Chief Editors. Read the winning articles.