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Case Reports in Nephrology
Volume 2011, Article ID 413532, 4 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/413532
Case Report

Application of Skin Electrical Conductance of Acupuncture Meridians for Ureteral Calculus: A Case Report

1Graduate Institute of Integrated Medicine, School of Chinese Medicine and Graduate Institute of Clinical Medical Science, China Medical University, Taichung 40402, Taiwan
2Departments of Urology, Obstetrics and Gynecology, Neurosurgery, and Medical Research, China Medical University Hospital, Taichung 40402, Taiwan
3Graduate Institute of Geriatric Medicine, Anhui Medical University, Hefei 230000, China

Received 16 May 2011; Accepted 13 June 2011

Academic Editors: J. Maesaka and A. Segarra

Copyright © 2011 Wu-Chou Lin et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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