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Case Reports in Nephrology
Volume 2016, Article ID 9349280, 4 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/9349280
Case Report

Cystatin C Falsely Underestimated GFR in a Critically Ill Patient with a New Diagnosis of AIDS

1Hospital Pharmacy Services, Mayo Clinic, 200 First Street SW, Rochester, MN 55905, USA
2Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Mayo Clinic, 200 First Street SW, Rochester, MN 55905, USA
3Division of Nephrology and Hypertension, Mayo Clinic, 200 First Street SW, Rochester, MN 55905, USA

Received 11 March 2016; Accepted 26 April 2016

Academic Editor: Anja Haase-Fielitz

Copyright © 2016 Caitlin S. Brown et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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