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Case Reports in Neurological Medicine
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 291380, 5 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/291380
Case Report

A Rare Sequela of Acute Disseminated Encephalomyelitis

1Department of Internal Medicine, Howard University Hospital, Washington, DC 20060, USA
2Department of Neurology, Howard University Hospital, 2041 Georgia Avenue, Washington, DC 20060, USA

Received 22 March 2014; Accepted 13 May 2014; Published 26 May 2014

Academic Editor: Peter Berlit

Copyright © 2014 Vijay Kodadhala et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis is a demyelinating disease, typically occurring in children following a febrile infection or a vaccination. Primary and secondary immune responses contribute to inflammation and subsequent demyelination, but the exact pathogenesis is still unknown. Diagnosis of acute disseminated encephalomyelitis is strongly suggested by temporal relationship between an infection or an immunization and the onset of neurological symptoms. Biopsy is definitive. In general, the disease is self-limiting and the prognostic outcome is favorable with anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive agents. Locked-in syndrome describes patients who are awake and conscious but have no means of producing limb, speech, or facial movements. Locked-in syndrome is a rare complication of acute disseminated encephalomyelitis. We present a case of incomplete locked-in syndrome occurring in a 34-year-old male secondary to acute disseminated encephalomyelitis. Our case is unique, as acute disseminated encephalomyelitis occurred in a 34-year-old which was poorly responsive to immunosuppression resulting in severe disability.