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Case Reports in Neurological Medicine
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 514791, 3 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/514791
Case Report

Spinocerebellar Ataxia 7: A Report of Unaffected Siblings Who Married into Different SCA 7 Families

1Department of Neurology, Baylor College of Medicine, Michael E. DeBakey VA Medical Center, Parkinson's Disease Research Education and Clinical Center, Houston, TX 77030, USA
2Department of Neurology, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536, USA

Received 28 January 2014; Accepted 7 April 2014; Published 4 May 2014

Academic Editor: Reiji Koide

Copyright © 2014 Fariha Zaheer and Dominic Fee. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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