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Case Reports in Neurological Medicine
Volume 2015, Article ID 827168, 3 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/827168
Case Report

Funicular Myelosis in a Butcher: It Was the Cream Cans

1Department of Neurology, University Hospital Zürich, Frauenklinikstrasse 26, 8091 Zürich, Switzerland
2Medizinisch Radiologisches Institut (MRI Bethanien), Toblerstrasse 51, Bahnhofplatz, Stadelhofen, 8044 Zürich, Switzerland
3Department of Psychiatry, Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics, Hospital of Psychiatry, University of Zurich, Lenggstrasse 31, 8032 Zürich, Switzerland
4Neurorehabilitation, RehaClinic, Quellenstrasse 34, 5330 Bad Zurzach, Switzerland

Received 14 December 2014; Accepted 9 January 2015

Academic Editor: José Luis González-Gutiérrez

Copyright © 2015 Fabian Wolpert et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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