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Case Reports in Neurological Medicine
Volume 2016, Article ID 8725494, 5 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/8725494
Case Report

Imaging Evidence for Cerebral Hyperperfusion Syndrome after Intravenous Tissue Plasminogen Activator for Acute Ischemic Stroke

1Department of Neurology, Saint Louis University, Saint Louis, MO 63110, USA
2Department of Radiology, Saint Louis University, Saint Louis, MO 63110, USA

Received 13 January 2016; Revised 27 March 2016; Accepted 19 April 2016

Academic Editor: Isabella Laura Simone

Copyright © 2016 Yi Zhang et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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