Case Reports in Obstetrics and Gynecology
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Acceptance rate38%
Submission to final decision101 days
Acceptance to publication23 days
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Single Port 11 mm Laparoscopic Hysterectomy Performed on a 32-Year-Old Female with Adhesive Disease

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Case Reports in Obstetrics and Gynecology publishes case reports and case series related to obstetrics, maternal-fetal medicine, gynecology, gynecologic oncology, uro-gynecology, reproductive medicine, infertility, and reproductive endocrinology.

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Case Report

Two Cases of Ectopic Pregnancy Mimicking Gestational Trophoblastic Disease

A well-known typical feature of ectopic pregnancy is an evident gestational sac structure outside of the uterus. However, some cases show atypical appearance that is described as a heterogeneous hypervascular mass. We report two cases of ectopic pregnancy that presented heterogeneous findings mimicking gestational trophoblastic diseases but were correctly diagnosed as ectopic pregnancies on MRI. The first case was an interstitial pregnancy in which the patient underwent surgical treatment. The second case was a cesarean scar pregnancy that was treated conservatively but showed spurious enlargement of pregnancy-related lesions after the treatment. Both cases lacked myometrial invasion on MRI, and the patients were diagnosed with ectopic pregnancies. Invasive findings on MRI may discriminate ectopic pregnancy from trophoblastic tumors and avoid unnecessary hysterectomy.

Case Report

A Case of Trousseau’s Syndrome Accompanying Ovarian Cancer with Widespread Thromboembolisms

The patient was a 41-year-old woman, gravida 0. She had no notable medical history. Laparoscopic right salpingo-oophorectomy and left cystectomy were performed for bilateral ovarian endometriomas, which were both pathologically diagnosed as benign. Six months later, she presented with left lower abdominal pain and expressive aphasia. Examination revealed multiple cerebral infarctions and pulmonary embolism. The patient was diagnosed with Trousseau’s syndrome secondary to ovarian cancer, and anticoagulant therapy was initiated. Despite treatment, she developed visual field loss due to occlusion of the left retinal artery; dizziness due to cerebellar infarction and myocardial infarction; and right hemiplegia due to new cerebral infarction. She received chemotherapy (two courses of paclitaxel and carboplatin), which did not improve her condition, and died two months after onset. An autopsy revealed that her left ovary was enlarged to a size of 12 cm and an endometrioid carcinoma G2 was identified. Ovarian cancer had spread throughout the abdominal cavity, and a large amount of pleural and ascites fluid was present. Multiple thrombi were found in bilateral pulmonary arteries and bilateral common iliac veins. There was a 2.5 cm thrombus in the left ventricle apex, and the anterior descending branch was obstructed by thrombus with recanalization.

Case Report

Hidradenitis Suppurativa Recurrence in a Caesarean Scar

Hidradenitis suppurativa (HS), also known as acne inversa, is a chronic, relapsing inflammatory skin condition characterised by the presence of painful nodules, abscesses, and sinus tracts or scarring. Affecting up to 4% of the population, it is not uncommon and is seen predominantly in females at a ratio of 3 : 1. HS carries a substantial burden for those who suffer from it, from the significant psychosocial impact, to the cost of the multitude of topical and systemic treatments which often do not successfully control its symptoms. In this case report, we discuss a 33-year-old female known to our clinic, who presented with a recurrence of her HS in a caesarean scar, with otherwise silent disease. From our review of the literature, this appears to be only the second case of recurrence of HS in a caesarean scar reported to date. With a predilection for females of reproductive ages, involvement of sensitive areas, and an average of greater than seven years from onset of symptoms until diagnosis, the ability to recognise HS and ensure referral for specialist management is essential for all who are regularly involved in the management of this patient group.

Case Report

Ovarian Solid Pseudopapillary Tumor Resembling Benign Hemorrhagic Cyst on Rapid Frozen Section

Solid pseudopapillary tumors are rare, with the majority of described cases originating in the pancreas. To date, there are only 10 documented reports of primary ovarian solid pseudopapillary tumors. Here, we describe the case of a 24-year-old woman who presented with worsening pelvic pain and dysmenorrhea. Workup demonstrated a right ovarian solid mass on ultrasound and an elevated serum LDH, which raised concerns for dysgerminoma due to her relatively young age. Therefore, she was taken to the operating room and underwent laparoscopic right salpingo-oophorectomy. On initial rapid frozen section, her ovarian cyst had a grossly hemorrhagic appearance with multiple hemosiderin deposits noted microscopically, which suggested a benign hemorrhagic cyst. However, the final pathology was reported as solid pseudopapillary tumor based on several defining histologic characteristics. Most importantly, immunostaining was positive for β-catenin and negative for E-cadherin. This report presents a brief review of the current literature on primary ovarian solid pseudopapillary tumors, including a discussion of expected prognosis after surgical resection, as well as a discussion of the role of immunohistochemistry (IHC) in differentiating ovarian neoplasms in young premenopausal women.

Case Report

Successful Detection of Unrecognized Rickettsia typhi in Pregnancy Using Cell-Free Next-Generation Sequencing

Flea-borne (murine) typhus is caused by Rickettsia typhi. Infection in pregnant women can lead to adverse outcomes when diagnosis and treatment is delayed. We describe how next-generation sequencing (NGS) using the Karius® test was used to rapidly diagnose murine typhus in two pregnant women admitted to a large tertiary care center in Houston, Texas, when all initial testing was nondiagnostic.

Case Report

The Largest Tubal Pregnancy: 14th Week

Subsequent development and implantation of embryo outside the uterine lining are defined as an ectopic pregnancy. Ectopic pregnancies have a wide range of presentations, for example, acute hemoperitoneum to chronic ectopic pregnancy. The case presented is an unusual case of ectopic pregnancy with large hematosalpinx with classic symptoms. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this case is the largest intact tubal ectopic pregnancy reported ever in the 14th week of gestation. A 40-year-old patient presented to the emergency department with lower abdominal pain, mild dysuria, and loose motion. The patient’s previous menstrual cycles were regular till four months ago, then started to be irregular, and she had no history of chronic diseases except repeated pelvic inflammatory diseases (PID). Clinically, the patient was hemodynamically stable. On palpation, the abdomen was tender, and cervical movements were not tender. BHCG in the blood came very high. The bedside point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS) showed free fluid in the abdomen and a sac in the left adnexa with a living fetus (visible heartbeats). The conventional ultrasound showed 14 weeks of an extrauterine gestational sac with visible early pregnancy. Differential diagnosis was either an abdominal pregnancy versus a complicated tubal pregnancy. The surgical pathology report confirmed the diagnosis of ectopic tubal pregnancy as the tube was dilated in the middle portion containing chorionic villi, decidual reaction, and the whole gestational sac consistent with the ectopic tubal pregnancy. The patient had a successful laparotomy with salpingectomy and hemostasis and did well after the operation. So, an intact ectopic tubal pregnancy may last until the 14th week of gestation.

Case Reports in Obstetrics and Gynecology
 Journal metrics
Acceptance rate38%
Submission to final decision101 days
Acceptance to publication23 days
CiteScore-
Impact Factor-
 Submit

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