Case Reports in Obstetrics and Gynecology
 Journal metrics
See full report
Acceptance rate29%
Submission to final decision100 days
Acceptance to publication18 days
CiteScore0.400
Journal Citation Indicator-
Impact Factor-

Indexing news

Case Reports in Obstetrics and Gynecology has recently been accepted in Scopus.

Go to Table of Contents

 Journal profile

Case Reports in Obstetrics and Gynecology publishes case reports and case series related to obstetrics, maternal-fetal medicine, gynecology, gynecologic oncology, uro-gynecology, reproductive medicine, infertility, and reproductive endocrinology.

 Editor spotlight

Case Reports in Obstetrics and Gynecology maintains an Editorial Board of practicing researchers from around the world, to ensure manuscripts are handled by editors who are experts in the field of study.

 Abstracting and Indexing

This journal's articles appear in a wide range of abstracting and indexing databases, and are covered by numerous other services that aid discovery and access. Find out more about where and how the content of this journal is available.

Latest Articles

More articles
Case Report

Oocyte Retrieval in Asymptomatic Patients Positive for SARS-CoV-2

Objective. To report two cases of oocyte retrieval performed in asymptomatic SARS-CoV-2-positive patients. Design. Case report. Setting. Outpatient private practice infertility center. Patients. A 28-year-old woman at risk for OHSS who took her trigger injection prior to testing positive for SARS-CoV-2 and a 19-year-old oncofertility patient who tested positive prior to retrieval due to a family exposure. Both patients were asymptomatic. Main Outcome Measures. Cycle outcomes, patient safety, and staff safety. Results. Both patients underwent successful oocyte retrieval procedures without developing symptoms or complications from COVID-19. No staff members that cared for these patients developed symptoms of COVID-19. Conclusion. Worsening fertility outcomes and potential for psychological and financial burdens to the patient must be balanced with risk of perioperative complications in patients testing positive for SARS-CoV-2. As we continue to provide fertility care in a world with COVID-19, appropriate risk mitigation strategies should be implemented to minimize exposure to SARS-CoV-2.

Case Report

Retroperitoneal Hydropic Leiomyoma Mimicking an Ovarian Cyst

Leiomyoma is the most common benign neoplasm of the reproductive organs in women. Retroperitoneal hydropic leiomyoma is rare type of myoma. Herein, we present the case of a 46-year-old (gravida 0) woman with retroperitoneal hydropic leiomyoma that was preoperatively diagnosed as an ovarian cyst. Transvaginal sonography and abdominal computed tomography revealed a mass, measuring , with solid and cystic components in the right pelvic cavity. The patient underwent laparoendoscopic single-site surgery for the tumor excision. During the surgery, a retroperitoneal cystic tumor was resected from the right retroperitoneal cavity. Histopathologic and microscopic examinations revealed a hydropic leiomyoma with infarction. This case is impressive because of the rare location and hydropic degeneration of the leiomyoma. Furthermore, it mimicked an ovarian cyst at its initial presentation making accurate diagnosis difficult. By warning of this case, surgeons can recognize the disease entities and provide the necessary treatment.

Case Report

Case Report of a Triplet Pregnancy with Complete Hydatidiform Mole and Coexisting Twins

Background. Triplet pregnancy with complete hydatidiform mole and coexisting twin fetuses is extremely rare with an unknown incidence. Case. Here, we present a case report of a pregnancy with twin fetuses and concurrent hydatidiform mole that resulted in the preterm delivery of one viable baby, the unfortunate intrauterine demise of the other twin, and successful treatment of gestational trophoblastic neoplasia in the postpartum period. Conclusion. This case highlights several important questions that arise for women who choose to carry a multiple gestation pregnancy with complete hydatidiform mole and describes complications that can occur. It is imperative to accurately assess risks and counsel individuals who elect to carry these pregnancies to provide the best possible outcomes.

Case Series

Fetal Deaths in SARS-CoV-2-Infected Pregnant Women: A Portuguese Case Series

Introduction. Stillbirth has been documented as an outcome of SARS-CoV-2 infection in pregnancy. Placental hypoperfusion and inflammation secondary to maternal immune response seem to play a role in the cascade of events that contribute to fetal death. The aim of our study is to report a perinatal outcome of SARS-CoV-2 infection in pregnancy adding information to the pool of data on COVID-19 pregnancy outcomes. Case Presentation. This is the first stillbirth case series occurring in pregnant women infected with SARS-CoV-2 in a Portuguese cohort. Between April 2020 and March 2021, we had 2680 births in our centre, of which 130 (4.95%) involved mothers infected with SARS-CoV-2. Of total births, there were 14 stillbirths (0.52%), accounting for the highest stillbirth rate we have had in the last 5 years. Among these 14 stillbirths, 5 (35.71%) occurred in SARS-CoV-2-infected mothers. We report the clinical features and placental histopathologic findings of 4 stillbirth cases that occurred in our hospital. Discussion. The stillbirth rate among SARS-CoV-2-infected pregnant women (5/130; 3.84%) was significantly increased compared to noninfected patients (9/2550; 0.35%). Most women (3/4) were asymptomatic for COVID-19, a surprising outcome, given the current literature. All cases had histologic exams showing placental signs of vascular malperfusion, although we acknowledge that 3/5 had obstetric conditions related to placental vascular impairment such as preeclampsia and HELLP syndrome. Conclusion. Stillbirth can be a perinatal consequence of SARS-CoV-2 infection in pregnancy, even in asymptomatic patients. We urge more studies to explore the association between SARS-CoV-2 infection and the risk of stillbirth.

Case Report

A Case of Ruptured Decidualized Ovarian Endometrioma: Usefulness of Serial MRI for Determining Adequate Management

Decidualization can originate in ovarian endometrioma by elevated serum progesterone levels during pregnancy, which mimics malignancy on ultrasonography. Moreover, decidualized ovarian endometrioma may rupture and cause acute abdominal pain during pregnancy. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is reportedly useful in differentiating decidualized ovarian endometriomas from malignancies. However, to our knowledge, serial MRI of decidualized ovarian endometrioma before and after rupture has not been reported. Herein, we report the case of a 39-year-old woman with a ruptured decidualized ovarian endometrioma in which serial MRI was useful for adequate management. She had a history of right ovarian endometrioma. Transvaginal ultrasonography at 20 weeks of gestation showed the known right ovarian endometrioma with mural nodules that were not evident before pregnancy. MRI for further evaluation showed ovarian endometrioma with mural nodules with signals similar to those of the placenta. Based on the MRI findings, we diagnosed a decidualized ovarian endometrioma. At 27 weeks of gestation, she complained of sudden abdominal pain, for which MRI was performed. MRI showed disappearance of the ovarian endometrioma and bloody ascites, based on which we diagnosed a ruptured ovarian endometrioma. The abdominal pain subsided immediately, and a conservative observational treatment approach was taken. At 37 weeks of gestation, right ovarian cystectomy was performed simultaneously with an elective cesarean section, which revealed a ruptured decidualized ovarian endometrioma. Our findings demonstrate that the accurate diagnosis of a ruptured decidualized ovarian endometrioma on serial MRI can contribute to its management.

Case Report

Spontaneous Heterotopic Pregnancy: Diagnosis and Management

Background. Heterotopic pregnancies albeit rare are conceivably life-threatening if missed. With the development of assisted reproductive techniques, the incidence has increased. Confirmation of an intrauterine pregnancy (IUP) should not preclude the existence of a heterotopic pregnancy. Case. A healthy 27-year-old patient (gravida 4, term 1, preterm 0, abortion 2, living 1) at approximately 5 weeks gestation through natural conception presented to the emergency room with acute abdominal pain and vaginal bleeding. Pelvic ultrasound showed evidence of an IUP and a right adnexal mass, raising suspicion for a heterotopic pregnancy. The patient underwent an uncomplicated laparoscopic right salpingectomy. An IUP was confirmed on ultrasound postoperatively. The patient had an early pregnancy loss at 8 weeks of gestation. Conclusion. With a high index of suspicion from clinical presentation and pelvic imaging, heterotopic pregnancy, while rare, should not be ruled out.

Case Reports in Obstetrics and Gynecology
 Journal metrics
See full report
Acceptance rate29%
Submission to final decision100 days
Acceptance to publication18 days
CiteScore0.400
Journal Citation Indicator-
Impact Factor-
 Submit

Article of the Year Award: Outstanding research contributions of 2021, as selected by our Chief Editors. Read the winning articles.