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Case Reports in Obstetrics and Gynecology
Volume 2014, Article ID 712657, 4 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/712657
Case Report

Ependymoma and Carcinoid Tumor Associated with Ovarian Mature Cystic Teratoma in a Patient with Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia I

1Department of Pathology, University of Louisville Hospital, 530 South Jackson Street, Louisville, KY 40202, USA
2Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Division of Gynecologic Oncology, James Graham Brown Cancer Center, 529 South Jackson Street, Louisville, KY 40202, USA

Received 5 February 2014; Accepted 19 March 2014; Published 10 April 2014

Academic Editor: Kyousuke Takeuchi

Copyright © 2014 Reed Spaulding et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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