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Case Reports in Obstetrics and Gynecology
Volume 2017, Article ID 1653529, 3 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/1653529
Case Report

A Third Surgically Managed Ectopic Pregnancy after Two Salpingectomies Involving the Opposite Tube

1Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Hashimoto Municipal Hospital, Wakayama, Japan
2Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Wakayama Medical University, Wakayama, Japan

Correspondence should be addressed to Naoyuki Iwahashi; pj.ca.dem-amayakaw@ikuyoan

Received 22 September 2016; Accepted 19 December 2016; Published 2 January 2017

Academic Editor: Maria Grazia Porpora

Copyright © 2017 Naoyuki Iwahashi et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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