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Case Reports in Oncological Medicine
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 953698, 5 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/953698
Case Report

Male Pelvic Squamous Cell Carcinoma of Unknown Primary Origin

1University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH 45267, USA
2Division of Radiology, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH 45267, USA
3Division of Pathology, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH 45267, USA
4The Vontz Center for Molecular Studies, 3125 Eden Avenue, RM 1312, ML 0562, Cincinnati, OH 45267, USA

Received 15 August 2014; Accepted 24 October 2014; Published 13 November 2014

Academic Editor: Constantine Gennatas

Copyright © 2014 Lauren Chiec et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Pelvic squamous cell carcinoma of unknown primary origin has been described in several case reports of female patients. However, there have been no published reports describing male patients with pelvic squamous cell cancer of unknown primary origin. Our case describes a 52-year-old man who presented with right buttock pain, rectal urgency, and constipation. His physical examination demonstrated tenderness to palpation around his gluteal folds. Computed tomography scan of his abdomen and pelvis demonstrated a large mass in his retroperitoneum. The mass was determined to be squamous cell carcinoma of unknown primary origin. Additionally, the patient had small nodules in his right lower lung lobe and right hepatic lobe. The patient was treated with concomitant chemoradiation, including cisplatin and intensity-modulated radiation therapy, followed by carboplatin and paclitaxel. The patient achieved partial remission, in which he remained one year after his presentation. Our case is consistent with the literature which suggests that squamous cell carcinoma of unknown primary origin occurring outside of the head and neck region may have a more favorable prognosis than other carcinomas of unknown primary origin. Further studies are necessary to determine the most appropriate work-up, diagnosis, and optimal treatment strategies.