Case Reports in Orthopedics
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Brachialis Muscle Rupture in a Pediatric Patient Followed Up by Ultrasound Examinations: A Rare Case Report

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Case Reports in Orthopedics publishes case reports and case series related to arthroplasty, foot and ankle surgery, hand surgery, joint replacement, limb reconstruction, pediatric orthopaedics, sports medicine, trauma etc.

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Case Report

A Change in the Classical Order of Setting of Porous Metal Augments with Locked Cups in Hip Revision Surgery: Technical Note and Case Report

Introduction. Reconstruction of acetabular bone defects by the combination of trabecular metal augments and porous cups can be complex when extensive bone loss and poor-quality bone exists. The onset of porous cups with an interlocking mechanism may simplify surgical technique due to its superior initial mechanical stability. We endorse the possibility for a change in the classical order of setting of the augments and the cup. Methods. We present a technical modification and a series of cases of three patients with Paprosky IIB and IIIA acetabular defects operated with a combination of porous metal augments and a porous cup. In all the three patients, the setting of the cup was done first and secured with locked screws, and then the augments were set in place as a wedge and fixed with screws in a standard fashion. Results. The postoperative X-ray showed good position of implants with restoration of the center of rotation, and the patients had good recovery. Radiological evaluation in the midterm follow-up did not show mobilization of implants. Discussion. The use of metal porous augments is widely used for severe acetabular defects, being a versatile system to adapt to the different size defects. Nevertheless, its use may be technically demanding and time consuming. It is not infrequent that the setting of the augments conditions the final position of the cup with a possible interference with initial stability and eventually bone ingrowth of the cup. The interlocking mechanism offers an additional biomechanical stability and thus may allow us to place the cup first in the desired position with a less demanding technique. Conclusion. With the use of locked-screw porous metal cups, the order of setting of implants may be changed in order to obtain a better restoration of the center of rotation and increased host-bone implant contact with a simplified surgical technique.

Case Report

Lumbar Canal Stenosis Caused by Marked Bone Overgrowth after Decompression Surgery

Narrowing of the lumbar canal due to bone regrowth after lumbar decompression surgery generally occurs at the facet joint; it is exceedingly rare for this phenomenon to occur at the laminar arch. Herein, we describe a case of restenosis caused by marked bone overgrowth at the facet joints and laminar arch after lumbar decompression surgery. A 64-year-old man underwent partial hemilaminectomy for lumbar canal stenosis at the L3/L4 level 12 years ago. His symptoms recurred 7 years after the first surgery. Overgrowth of the laminar arch and facet joints was observed at the decompression site. Thus, partial laminectomy of L3 and L4 was performed as a second surgery. Four years after the second surgery, a laminectomy of L3-L4 was performed for bone restenosis and disc herniation. The underlying mechanism of the remarkable overgrowth of the removed lamina remains unclear. Endochondral ossification signals and mechanosignals should be comprehensively examined.

Case Report

A Case Report of a Subdural Hematoma following Spinal Epidural prior to a Total Knee Arthroplasty

Introduction. This case report adds to current literature on management of a subdural hematoma following total knee arthroplasty and is particularly important as joint replacement moves into outpatient surgery centers where the orthopedic surgery team becomes the sole patient contact point. Case Presentation. A 66-year-old male presented to the emergency department five days after elective robotic-assisted left total knee arthroplasty performed with spinal epidural with the symptoms of a persistent nonpostural headache. CT of the head revealed a small bifrontal acute subdural hematoma. He was admitted for overnight monitoring as a precaution. No vascular abnormalities or underlying pathology was found on further advanced imaging. He was discharged the following morning after follow-up CT showed no focal changes. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) one month later confirmed resolution of the subdural hematoma. Conclusion. Orthopedic surgeons should be aware of the signs and symptoms, as well as the risk factors for subdural hematomas following lumbar puncture, as it is a rare, but potentially life-threatening complication of spinal epidural.

Case Report

Lumbar Radiculopathy Caused by Epidural Gas Collection

Background. Degenerated intervertebral discs in the lumbar spine are commonly found with vacuum phenomenon. In a few cases, gas can migrate into the lumbar spinal canal and compress the nerve root. Case Presentation. We report a case of lumbar radiculopathy caused by epidural gas collection in a 59-year-old woman. Originally, the gas was formed in the intervertebral disc and possibly migrated backward because of the motion of lumbar spine, forming a single large gas formation. The nerve root was freed from the gas-filled cyst after needle puncture was performed. Patient’s symptoms in the leg were significantly relieved following surgery. Conclusion. There is still no satisfactory explanation for the pathogenesis of gas formation in the spinal canal. In our case, the presence of gas in the spinal canal and gas inside a narrowed disc suggests a communication between the two structures.

Case Series

Osteochondritis Lesions of the Ischiopubic Area in Young Adolescents

Osteochondritis of the ischiopubic area is a rare disease of children that presents with hip pain and limping. Careful examination and appropriate investigations are essential to establish a definite diagnosis. We report a case series of four children, ages 10–14-year-old, with osteochondritis of the ischiopubic area. Plain X-ray examination showed an area of diffuse irregular calcification of the ischium in two of the children, while in the other two there was an asymmetrical enlargement of the ischiopubic synchondrosis. MRI investigation was the most helpful examination. Bone edema was found in all four children. A calcified mass separated from the host ischium was found in the first two children. The cortex was normal, without irregular destruction. Bone edema of both the ischium and pubic alongside the synchondrosis was found in the following two children, with intact cortices and asymmetrical enlargement. Osteochondritis lesions of the ischium and the ischiopubic area have radiological findings similar to several severe diseases. Bone edema on MRI investigation in children must be properly evaluated. Appropriate radiological examination enabled us to confirm the diagnosis of the osteochondritis and to avoid unnecessary procedures. We want to draw attention to the rare diagnosis of osteochondritis of the ischiopubic area, and the clinical significance, as a cause of hip pain and limping in children.

Case Report

Acetabular Reconstruction Using Multiple Porous Tantalum Augments: Three-Quarter Football Augment

Reconstruction of a large acetabular bone defect is a complex problem in revision hip arthroplasty. The authors report a novel method of reconstructing an uncontained acetabular defect (Paprosky type IIIb) using multiple tantalum augments. A 73-year-old female patient presented to our institution with a chronically dislocated primary left total hip arthroplasty with radiographs demonstrating migration of acetabular component and formation of pseudoarthrosis within the left ilium. Extensive arthrolysis and anatomic reconstruction of the acetabular bone defect were performed using the novel method of multiple tantalum augments. Postoperatively, recovery was initially complicated by multiple dislocations requiring an exchange to an elevated liner, however subsequently achieved good function.

Case Reports in Orthopedics
 Journal metrics
See full report
Acceptance rate33%
Submission to final decision93 days
Acceptance to publication17 days
CiteScore-
Journal Citation Indicator-
Impact Factor-
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Article of the Year Award: Outstanding research contributions of 2021, as selected by our Chief Editors. Read the winning articles.