Table of Contents Author Guidelines Submit a Manuscript
Case Reports in Orthopedics
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 932167, 3 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/932167
Case Report

Hypersensitivity to Suture Anchors

1Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Kurume University Medical Center, 155 Kokubu-machi, Kurume, Fukuoka 839-0863, Japan
2Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Kurume University, 67 Asahi-machi, Kurume, Fukuoka 830-0011, Japan

Received 23 May 2013; Accepted 25 June 2013

Academic Editors: A. Nehme and A. Ramasamy

Copyright © 2013 Masafumi Goto et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Hypersensitivity to suture anchor is extremely rare. Herein, we present a case in which hypersensitivity to suture anchor was strongly suspected. The right rotator cuff of a 50-year-old woman was repaired with a metal suture anchor. Three weeks after the surgery, she developed erythema around her face, trunk, and hands, accompanied by itching. Infection was unlikely because no abnormalities were detected by blood testing or by medical examination. Suspicious of a metallic allergy, a dermatologist performed a patch testing 6 months after the first surgery. The patient had negative reactions to tests for titanium, aluminum, and vanadium, which were the principal components of the suture anchor. The anchor was removed 7 months after the first surgery, and the erythema disappeared immediately. When allergic symptoms occur and persist after the use of a metal anchor, removal should be considered as a treatment option even if the patch test result is negative.