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Case Reports in Orthopedics
Volume 2014, Article ID 698585, 3 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/698585
Case Report

Gunshot Wound in Lumbar Spine with Intradural Location of a Bullet

Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Hospital de Manises, Avenida Generalitat Valenciana 50, Manises, 46940 Valencia, Spain

Received 1 February 2014; Accepted 11 May 2014; Published 4 June 2014

Academic Editor: Arul Ramasamy

Copyright © 2014 G. Bordon and S. Burguet Girona. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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