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Case Reports in Pediatrics
Volume 2016 (2016), Article ID 9803975, 4 pages
Case Report

Neonatal Abdominal Hemangiomatosis: Propranolol beyond Infantile Hemangioma

1Department of Paediatrics, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Prince of Wales Hospital, Shatin, Hong Kong
2Department of Paediatrics, University of Calgary, 200-233 16th Avenue NW, Calgary, AB, Canada T2M 0H5
3Department of Anatomical & Cellular Pathology, Prince of Wales Hospital, Shatin, Hong Kong

Received 14 December 2015; Revised 25 February 2016; Accepted 14 March 2016

Academic Editor: Nina L. Shapiro

Copyright © 2016 Siu Ying Angel Nip et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.


Hemangioma is the most common vascular tumor of infancy; presentation is often as cutaneous infantile hemangioma (IH). Cutaneous hemangioma is a clinical diagnosis. Most IHs follow a benign course, with complete involution without treatment in the majority of cases. Visceral hemangioma often involves the liver and manifests as a life-threatening disorder. Hepatic hemangiomas may be associated with high output cardiac failure, coagulopathy, and hepatomegaly which generally develop between 1 and 16 weeks of age. Mortality has been reportedly high without treatment. We report a rare case of a male infant with neonatal hemangiomatosis with diffuse peritoneal involvement, which mimicked a malignant-looking tumor on imaging, and discuss therapeutic options and efficacy. Propranolol is efficacious for IH but generally not useful for other forms of vascular hemangiomas, tumors, and malformations. In our case of neonatal peritoneal hemangiomatosis, propranolol appears to have halted the growth and possibly expedite the involution of the hemangiomatosis without other treatments.