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Case Reports in Pediatrics
Volume 2017, Article ID 6708046, 3 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/6708046
Case Report

Appendicitis Caused by Primary Varicella Zoster Virus Infection in a Child with DiGeorge Syndrome

1Department of Clinical Microbiology, Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, Blegdamsvej 9, 2100 Copenhagen, Denmark
2Department of Pathology, Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, Blegdamsvej 9, 2100 Copenhagen, Denmark
3Department of Paediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, Blegdamsvej 9, 2100 Copenhagen, Denmark

Correspondence should be addressed to Lotte Møller Smedegaard; moc.liamg@smettol

Received 21 March 2017; Accepted 11 June 2017; Published 16 August 2017

Academic Editor: Carmelo Romeo

Copyright © 2017 Lotte Møller Smedegaard et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Introduction. Chickenpox is caused by varicella zoster virus (VZV). Although predominantly a mild disease, it can cause considerable morbidity and in rare occasions even mortality in healthy children as well as increased morbidity and mortality in immunocompromised patients. The aetiology of appendicitis is largely unknown but is thought to be multifactorial. Appendicitis is a suspected, but not well documented, complication from varicella zoster virus infection. Case Presentation. A five-year-old girl diagnosed with DiGeorge syndrome and a prolonged primary VZV infection was admitted due to abdominal pain, increasing diarrhoea, vomiting, and poor general condition. She developed perforated appendicitis and an intraperitoneal abscess. VZV DNA was detected by PCR in two samples from the appendix and pus from the abdomen, respectively. The child was treated with acyclovir and antibiotics and the abscess was drained twice. She was discharged two weeks after referral with no sequela. Conclusion. Abdominal pain in children with viral infections can be a challenge, and appendicitis has to be considered as a complication to acute viral diseases, especially if the child is immunocompromised.