Case Reports in Psychiatry
 Journal metrics
Acceptance rate58%
Submission to final decision103 days
Acceptance to publication14 days
CiteScore0.300
Impact Factor-

Augmentation of Antipsychotic Medications with Low-Dose Clozapine in Treatment-Resistant Schizophrenia—Case Reports and Discussion

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Case Reports in Psychiatry publishes case reports and case series in all areas of psychiatry.

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Case Report

An Argument for Expanding the Role of Pediatric Decision-Making and Preference in Child Abuse/Neglect Assessments and Plan

Child maltreatment can have long-term sequelae and thus requires appropriate interventions. In the United States, reports of suspected child maltreatment are primarily handled by the Child Protective Services (CPS). We present a case of a 12-year-old female who was involuntarily hospitalized for suicidal ideation after CPS responded to a report of her abuse by her mother. Despite continuously expressing fear of her mother and pleading to not be discharged home, CPS ultimately determined that the child was safe to return home to her abuser. The child’s subsequent loss to follow-up puts the child’s safety and long-term well-being into question. In this article, we discuss the current protocol of CPS reporting, investigation, and outcome. We also explore the roles of pediatric decision-making and forensic or custody evaluation when maltreatment is apparent.

Case Report

Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome (PRES) in a Patient with Opioid Use Disorder

Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome (PRES) is a characteristic clinical radiographic syndrome with diffuse structural alteration of cerebral white matter secondary to myelin damage with diverse and multifactorial etiologies. It can present with acutely altered mentation, somnolence or occasionally stupor, vision impairment, seizures, and sudden or chronic headaches that are not focal. The pathophysiology remains unclear, but mechanisms involving endothelial injury and dysregulation of cerebral autoregulation have been purported. We report the case of a 36-year-old male with a history of heroin use disorder, who was admitted to our hospital for opioid withdrawal. CT head without contrast and MRI with and without gadolinium showed significant white matter disease in both cerebral hemispheres and cerebellum. He was diagnosed with Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome secondary to heroin use and managed on the medical floor in collaboration with the neurology team. His clinical symptoms improved and he was discharged after six weeks. To our knowledge, this case did not present with the risk factors for PRES reported in the literature. For patients with heroin use disorder who present with an altered mental status, PRES should be highly suspected. The diagnosis and management require collaboration between psychiatry and neurology.

Case Report

Iatrogenic Complications of Compulsory Treatment in a Patient Presenting with an Emotionally Unstable Personality Disorder and Self-Harm

Attempted suicide and deliberate self-harm are common and challenging presentations in the emergency department. A proportion of these patients refuse interventions and this presents the clinical, legal, and ethical dilemma as to whether treatment should be provided against their will. Multiple factors influence this decision. It is difficult to foresee the multitude and magnitude of complications that can arise once it has been decided to treat individuals who do not consent. This case illustrates a particularly complex chain of events that occurred after treating someone against their will who presented with self-harm and suicidal ideation. These consequences are contrasted with those of not intervening when similar situations arose with the same patient.

Case Report

Body Dysmorphic Disorder Insights in an Inpatient Psychiatric Setting

Body dysmorphic disorder is a chronic disorder involving imagined or partial appearance defects that lead to significant impairment in everyday life. It is quite prevalent but remains a clinically underdiagnosed psychiatric condition especially in the inpatient psychiatric setting. Onset of body dysmorphic disorder typically begins in adolescence with subclinical symptoms. Over time, symptoms progress to patients meeting the full Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 5th edition (DSM-5) criteria. Severe cases of the body dysmorphic disorder are often camouflaged by concurrent diseases like major depressive disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, substance use disorder, and social anxiety disorder. Further, compounding the complexity of body dysmorphic disorder is a treatment of patients who present with coinciding suicidal ideations. Here, we present a unique case of a 40-year-old female admitted to an inpatient psychiatric unit for treatment of ongoing depression and suicidal symptoms. Early on in her inpatient course, she had symptoms of obsessive-compulsive disorder, social anxiety disorder, and alcohol use disorder. The constellation of symptoms prompted evaluation for body dysmorphic disorder and subsequent targeted treatment. This case report highlights the complexities associated with diagnosing body dysmorphic disorder, the importance of considering it a branch point for other psychiatric conditions, and the treatment for patients who present with coinciding suicidal behavior.

Case Report

Agitation and Sugar Craving Related to Epilepsy Seizure

Introduction. Epilepsy is a chronic central nervous system disorder characterized by the recurrence of unprovoked seizures and can affect people of all ages. Seizure symptoms can vary widely in patients. Many papers have been published about agitation and epileptic seizures, but almost nothing about sugar cravings and agitation related to epilepsy. The purpose of this case report is to shed light on possibly a hidden symptom within the epilepsy field, in fact sugar cravings. Case presentation. A 12-year-old boy was referred to the children and adolescent psychiatric outpatient clinic with suspicion of ADHD. The boy has struggled with anxiety, concentration, and impulsivity. Because of intense agitation and sugar cravings, the patient was referred to EEG. The EEG shows pathological activity with bilatero-temporal to central epileptiform activity, not synchronized. After pathological EEG findings, the patient started treatment with Lamotrigine. Great improvement when it comes to agitation, moodiness, and reduction of sugar craving after starting with Lamotrigine. Conclusion. We consider inexplicable behavior or symptoms such as agitation and sugar craving may be related to epilepsy seizure. Therefore, it is important that these patients should be examined more closely with EEG to confirm or deny epilepsy.

Case Report

“This Is Not the Original Timeline”: A Case Report of an Extended Dissociative Episode in a Healthy Young Male Accompanied with Severe Decline in Mental State

Dissociation is a disconnection between a person’s thoughts, memories, feelings, actions, or sense of who he or she is. Dissociative disorders can be described and understood using the combination of five core symptoms: amnesia, depersonalisation, derealisation, identity confusion, or identity alteration. They are frequently associated with previous experience of trauma. The challenge in diagnosis and the lifetime prevalence of approximately 10% in the general population and clinical psychiatric setting ensures the relevance of this case. We write about a 21-year-old gentleman with history of autism and obsessive compulsive disorder, but no significant medical history was presented to the emergency department with increased anxiety, subsequently progressing to agitation, pacing, and becoming nonverbal. No significant findings were uncovered on laboratory blood testing (other than prolactin 737 mu/L and phosphate 0.35 mmol/L), lumbar puncture, or brain imaging. Consequently, he was admitted to a psychiatric unit for assessment. The patient continued to present with severe disorientation, limited speech, and altered state of consciousness with occasional spastic-like movements. Antipsychotic and benzodiazepine medication was initiated, with no significant change in presentation. The patient continued to be witnessed wandering and having incoherent speech. First signs of improvement came 21 days postadmission with brief conversation and lucidity. This continued to improve over the next 7 days where he was reported to be at his baseline mental state. Environmental stressors including university examinations, the COVID-19 pandemic, and recent contact with his estranged father were possible precipitants to the episode. The patient reported almost complete unawareness of the psychiatric admission. A diagnosis of dissociative disorder, unspecified, was given. This case shows the management and diagnostic challenges of patients presenting with the aforementioned symptoms. There are no formal guidelines for the management of treating dissociative episodes, and this case report suggests the possible benefits of a drug-free period of watchful waiting upon admission.

Case Reports in Psychiatry
 Journal metrics
Acceptance rate58%
Submission to final decision103 days
Acceptance to publication14 days
CiteScore0.300
Impact Factor-
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