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Case Reports in Psychiatry
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 350417, 4 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/350417
Case Report

Severe Neuropsychiatric Reaction in a Deployed Military Member after Prophylactic Mefloquine

1Department of Psychiatry, University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, TX 78229, USA
259th Medical Operations Squadron, Wilford Hall Medical Center, San Antonio, TX 78236, USA

Received 19 June 2011; Accepted 11 July 2011

Academic Editors: D. De Leo, D. E. Dietrich, and D. Matsuzawa

Copyright © 2011 Alan L. Peterson et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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