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Case Reports in Psychiatry
Volume 2013, Article ID 840425, 4 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/840425
Case Report

Delayed Onset and Prolonged ECT-Related Delirium

1Department of Psychiatry, Virginia Commonwealth University, P.O. Box 980710, Richmond, VA 23298, USA
2Department of Psychiatry, Virginia Commonwealth University, P.O. Box 980268, Richmond, VA 23298, USA

Received 18 June 2013; Accepted 4 August 2013

Academic Editors: E. Jönsson, C. Lançon, D. Matsuzawa, and J. Saiz-Ruiz

Copyright © 2013 Sameer Hassamal et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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