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Case Reports in Psychiatry
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 408179, 2 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/408179
Case Report

Amisulpride Augmentation for Clozapine-Refractory Positive Symptoms: Additional Benefit in Reducing Hypersialorrhea

1Programa de Residência Médica em Psiquiatria do Instituto de Psiquiatria de Santa Catarina (IPQ/SC), 88.123-300 São José, SC, Brazil
2Centro de Neurociências Aplicadas, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, 88.040-970 Florianópolis, SC, Brazil

Received 12 January 2015; Revised 21 February 2015; Accepted 1 March 2015

Academic Editor: Toshiya Inada

Copyright © 2015 Fabiani Bogorni et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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