Case Reports in Surgery
 Journal metrics
Acceptance rate37%
Submission to final decision87 days
Acceptance to publication18 days
CiteScore-
Impact Factor-

Jejunal Diverticulosis Probably Leading to Pylephlebitis of the Superior Mesenteric Vein

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Case Reports in Surgery publishes case reports and case series related to all aspects of surgery. Topics include but are not limited to oncology, trauma, gastrointestinal, vascular, and transplantation surgery.

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Case Report

A Unique Case of Low-Grade Mucinous Neoplasm in Stump Appendectomy

Background. We describe a case of a young male with a history of appendectomy one year ago, who developed symptoms of stump appendicitis, and after removing this stump, histopathology showed low grade neoplasm. Summary. Stump appendicitis is an uncommon complication after appendectomy and may lead to serious complications. Management of low-grade appendiceal mucinous neoplasm (LAMN) is controversial, and we discuss the importance of the case. Conclusion. The case of young male post stump appendectomy with histopathology showing LAMN in the stump of the appendix, which to our knowledge, is the first in the medical literature and, discuss the stump appendicitis and incomplete appendectomy concerning malignancy, mucinous neoplasm, and adenocarcinoma.

Case Report

Jejunal Intussusception in Adolescent Crohn’s Disease: An Extremely Rare Complication

Proximal small bowel intussusception occurring in an adolescent Crohn’s disease patient is an extremely rare entity. It is usually primary without a lead point and quite often a transient phenomenon. We report such transient and intermittent jejunal intussusception in a 16-year-old male, developing immediately in a postoperative period after a stoma reversal for jejunal stricture perforation peritonitis.

Case Report

Trapped Esophageal Stent in a Child: An Unusual Complication

Background. Migration is the most frequent and well-known complication of self-expandable metal stents (SEMS). Most of the time, migrated stents are still in the esophagus and can be relocated or removed successfully through endoscopy. However, what can be done if the stent is stuck between two esophageal strictures? Herein, we present a child with a trapped esophageal stent. Method. A 2-year-old male patient with an esophageal stent which migrated and became stuck between two esophageal strictures was reported. Results. Proximal stricture was excised, and the stent was removed via a right thoracotomy. Balloon dilatation was applied to the distal stricture. The patient was discharged on the 17th postoperative day without any problem. Conclusions. Pediatric patients with an esophageal stent should be closely followed up during this period. Early detection of complications makes treatment easier. Otherwise, there may be no option other than surgical treatment, as in the patient presented here.

Case Report

Endometriosis of the Inguinal Canal Mimicking a Hydrocele of the Canal of Nuck

Isolated presentation of endometriosis of the inguinal canal is infrequent, and the clinical and imaging findings may be misleading in such patients. We describe an otherwise healthy female with isolated inguinal endometriosis presenting as a hydrocele of the canal of Nuck. Surgeons should consider such unusual presentations and obtain imaging and histological evaluations in doubtful instances. Complete excision was curative in our patient with no evidence of recurrence.

Case Report

Primary Appendiceal Adenocarcinoma Presenting with Hematochezia due to the Invading Tumor in the Sigmoid Colon

Primary appendiceal tumors are rare malignancies; some cases have been described to invade other organs, and this represents a very rare clinical condition. We report a case of appendiceal adenocarcinoma invading the sigmoid colon and a review of similar cases. A 69-year-old woman with complaints of hematochezia was admitted to the hospital. Colonoscopy revealed a tumor in the sigmoid colon, which was a well-differentiated tubular adenocarcinoma. A computed tomography scan showed an appendiceal mass that involved the sigmoid colon, suggesting an appendiceal cancer invading the sigmoid colon. Ileocecal resection with extended lymphadenectomy and en bloc resection of the sigmoid colon was performed. The appendiceal tumor involved the sigmoid colon and the terminal ileum. The ileocecal part which included the tumor and the involved sigmoid colon was resected in total. Macroscopic findings showed that the appendiceal tumor made a fistula with the sigmoid colon. Pathological examination revealed that the tumor was a well-differentiated tubular adenocarcinoma that invaded the sigmoid colon. The final pathological stage was T4bN0M0, stage IIC. The patient was discharged from the hospital uneventfully. She was alive without relapse after a 20-month follow-up. Although an appendiceal tumor invading the rectosigmoid region is rare, a preoperative diagnosis can be obtained that facilitates the planning of a suitable surgical procedure: en bloc resection of the ileocecal part and the rectosigmoid part.

Case Report

Robot-Assisted Partial Splenectomy for Splenic Epidermoid Cyst

The splenic cyst is a rare disease with unknown etiology. The inner wall of the cyst has lining epithelium. The cyst can be unilocular or multilocular. According to pathology, it can be divided into four types: epidermoid cyst, dermoid cyst, cystic lymphangioma, and cystic hemangioma. Ultrasound examination is often the first choice for splenic cysts because of its nonradiation, low cost, and convenient examination. The images are mostly cystic masses with clear borders and dark areas without echoes, after the detection of splenic space-occupying lesions by ultrasonography, CT, and MRI. Here, we report robot-assisted partial splenectomy for a splenic cyst. Imaging diagnosis of abdominal CT enhancement: the cystic space-occupying of the spleen is considered. We should improve the preoperative examination and exclude operative contraindications. During the operation, there was about 8 cm of the upper pole of the spleen, and the boundary was clear. There was no obvious abnormality in the exploration of the abdominal viscera. The operation was successful. The operative time was 115 minutes, and the blood loss was 20 ml. On the first day after the operation, the patient took a liquid diet. The time of first anal exhaust was on the second day after operation. The patient was discharged at the fourth day. Postoperative pathology revealed epidermoid cyst. The therapy strategy of the splenic cyst is ambiguous. Better understanding of the splenic segmental anatomy and surgical skills has made minimally invasive partial splenectomy a preferred treatment for splenic cysts. In this paper, we report a case of splenic epidermoid cyst managed successfully by robot-assisted partial splenectomy.

Case Reports in Surgery
 Journal metrics
Acceptance rate37%
Submission to final decision87 days
Acceptance to publication18 days
CiteScore-
Impact Factor-
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