Case Reports in Surgery
 Journal metrics
Acceptance rate37%
Submission to final decision87 days
Acceptance to publication18 days
CiteScore-
Impact Factor-

Large Brunner’s Gland Hyperplasia with Bleeding: A Case Report

Read the full article

 Journal profile

Case Reports in Surgery publishes case reports and case series related to all aspects of surgery. Topics include but are not limited to oncology, trauma, gastrointestinal, vascular, and transplantation surgery.

 Editor spotlight

Case Reports in Surgery maintains an Editorial Board of practicing researchers from around the world, to ensure manuscripts are handled by editors who are experts in the field of study.

 Abstracting and Indexing

This journal's articles appear in a wide range of abstracting and indexing databases, and are covered by numerous other services that aid discovery and access. Find out more about where and how the content of this journal is available.

Latest Articles

More articles
Case Report

Bilateral Primary Total Knee Arthroplasty and Reconstruction of the Medial Tibial Plateau by an Asymmetric Cone in a Patient with Charcot Arthropathy

Charcot arthropathy of the knee is an extremely rare orthopedic disease that is very challenging for the treating physician and is associated with many complications, especially if it is occurring on both knees. Meanwhile, in the advanced stage, despite many potential complications, TKA is recognized as the gold standard. However, destruction of the medial tibial plateau is typical for the disease, which makes a stable anchorage of the prosthesis much more difficult. Therefore, we present a case in which sufficient primary stability could be achieved with an asymmetrical second-generation tibial cone with an anatomical design and implantation instruments adapted to the bony anatomy in the presence of severe tibial destruction on both sides. In the two-year follow-up, the patient showed good mobility and stability on both sides. In advanced Charcot arthropathy of the knee, the use of asymmetric tibial cones appears to be an appropriate solution for secure fixation and stability of the implant.

Case Report

Atraumatic Splenic Rupture in a SARS-CoV-2 Patient: Case Report and Review of Literature

Splenic rupture in the absence of trauma or previously diagnosed disease is rare. Due to the delay of diagnosis and treatment, this is a potentially life-threatening condition. We report a case of atraumatic splenic rupture in a SARS-CoV-2 patient. This report is of particular interest as it first identifies SARS-CoV-2 infection as a possible cause of spontaneous rupture of the spleen. A 46-year-old Caucasian woman presented at the emergency department pale and sweaty, complaining of syncopal episodes, tachycardia, hypotension, diarrhea, intense abdominal pain, diffuse arthromyalgia, and fever from the day before. RT-PCR was positive for SARS-CoV-2 infection. CT scan demonstrated extensive hemoperitoneum due to rupture of the splenic capsule. The patient required an emergency open splenectomy because of an unresponsive hemorrhagic shock. At the end of the surgery, the patient was relocated to a COVID-19 dedicated facility. COVID-19 is a new disease of which all manifestations are not yet known. Inpatients affected by SARS-CoV-2 infection with abdominal pain and spontaneous splenic rupture should be considered to avoid a delayed diagnosis.

Case Report

Candida Albicans Osteomyelitis after Chest Wall Blunt Trauma: A Case Report

Fungal osteomyelitis is a rare disease that can occur in immunocompromised patients. We report a case of a patient with a primary rib osteomyelitis after a blunt trauma of the chest wall. Aggressive surgical debridement along with antifungal therapy was the cornerstone of the disease management in this patient.

Case Report

Ventral Primary Hernia with Liver Content

Background. Herniation of the liver through the anterior abdominal wall is an extremely rare phenomenon. Most cases occur within an incisional hernia (mostly upper abdomen surgery or cardiac surgery). Only two reports mentioned liver herniation without previous abdominal incision. Case Presentation. We report the case of a 70-year-old woman presenting an epigastric swelling. Radiological findings showed a liver herniation in a primary ventral hernia. This case is the first to have been described requiring semiurgent hernia repair associated with partial liver resection. Conclusion. This case is, to the best of our knowledge, the first case of primary ventral hernia with liver content necessitating wedge resection of the left liver lobe.

Case Report

Rare Contents of an Internal Hernia through a Defect of the Broad Ligament of the Uterus

Herniation through a defect of the uterine broad ligament is a rare internal hernia that is difficult to diagnose definitively. Common hernia contents contain ileal loops. Herein, we report a rare case of internal herniation of both the ileum and fallopian tube through a defect of the broad ligament. A 52-year-old woman presented to our hospital with suprapubic pain and vomiting. She had a history of bowel obstruction following cesarean section. On abdominopelvic computed tomography, we suspected a closed-loop obstruction associated with bowel herniation in the right broad ligament. However, we could not identify an area of poor enhancement adjacent to distended small intestines. Emergency laparoscopic exploration revealed a viable ileal loop and incarcerated organ. Therefore, we switched to laparotomy that revealed the right fallopian tube as the ischemic organ. We reduced the hernia, resected necrotic right fallopian tube, and closed the defect of the broad ligament. The patient had an uneventful postoperative course. Rare hernia contents might complicate preoperative clinical diagnosis. Laparoscopy is useful for establishing a definitive diagnosis and treating broad ligament hernias.

Case Report

A Thought-Provoking Case of Successfully Treated Carcinoma of the Head of the Pancreas with Metachronous Lung Metastasis: Impact of Distal Spleno-Renal Shunt for Regional Invasion on Long-Term Period after Pancreaticoduodenectomy

When performing pancreaticoduodenectomy with resection of the confluence of the superior mesenteric vein and portal vein, division of the splenic vein may cause sinistral portal hypertension resulting in gastrointestinal bleeding, splenic congestion, and hypersplenism. To prevent these adverse events, it is important to intentionally decompress the splenic vein. This report is of a 68-year-old woman with stage IA carcinoma of the head of the pancreas who survived for more than six years following tumor resection and pancreaticoduodenectomy and distal splenorenal shunt. A 68-year-old woman was diagnosed with carcinoma of the head of the pancreas that involved the confluence of the superior mesenteric vein, portal vein, and splenic vein. No unresectable cancer sites or distant metastases were detected. Pancreaticoduodenectomy with resection of the confluence of the superior mesenteric vein and portal vein was performed. The superior mesenteric vein and portal vein were anastomosed in the end-to-end fashion, and the remnant splenic vein was anastomosed to the superior aspect of the left renal vein in the end-to-side fashion. At 22 months after the initial surgery, the patient underwent partial lung resection for a metachronous lung metastasis. For 6 years after the initial surgery, the venous reconstructions have maintained their patency without any obstruction of splenic venous flow, and the patient has remained in good health without further metastases or recurrences. This case has shown the importance of early diagnosis of carcinoma of the head of the pancreas, as appropriate and timely surgical management can result in good outcome. This patient responded well and remains alive six years following pancreaticoduodenectomy and preservation of the spleen with the use of a distal splenorenal shunt.

Case Reports in Surgery
 Journal metrics
Acceptance rate37%
Submission to final decision87 days
Acceptance to publication18 days
CiteScore-
Impact Factor-
 Submit