Case Reports in Surgery
 Journal metrics
Acceptance rate37%
Submission to final decision87 days
Acceptance to publication19 days
CiteScore-
Impact Factor-
 Submit

Incarcerated Appendix Epiploica in Inguinal Hernia Sac: Treatment with Laparoscopic TAPP Approach—Report of a Rare Case

Read the full article

 Journal profile

Case Reports in Surgery publishes case reports and case series related to all aspects of surgery. Topics include but are not limited to oncology, trauma, gastrointestinal, vascular, and transplantation surgery.

 Editor spotlight

Case Reports in Surgery maintains an Editorial Board of practicing researchers from around the world, to ensure manuscripts are handled by editors who are experts in the field of study.

 Abstracting and Indexing

This journal's articles appear in a wide range of abstracting and indexing databases, and are covered by numerous other services that aid discovery and access. Find out more about where and how the content of this journal is available.

Latest Articles

More articles
Case Report

A Rare Cause of Persistent Blood Loss after Continuous Ambulatory Peritoneal Dialysis Catheter Placement

The laparoscopic placement of a continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) catheter is a widely used method in patients with end stage renal disease (ESRD). The potential complications of this procedure include perforation of intra-abdominal organs, surgical site infection, peritonitis, catheter migration, catheter blockage, port site herniation, and bleeding. In most cases, bleeding is considered to be an early-onset complication because it mostly occurs within the first seven days after surgery. We report a case of a 68-year-old female patient with a previous history of diabetes mellitus, myelodysplastic syndrome, extensive collateral varices, anaemia, and ESRD due to obstructive uropathy caused by retroperitoneal fibrosis, who presented with persistent blood loss after the laparoscopic placement of a CAPD catheter. Duplex ultrasonography showed that the CAPD catheter was transfixing a superficial epigastric varicose vein, a collateral vein, due to the occlusion of the left external iliac vein. Persistent blood loss after inserting a CAPD catheter without previous imaging of abdominal wall vessels is an indication for further diagnostics.

Case Report

Surgical Management of L5-S1 Spondylodiscitis on Previously Documented Isthmic Spondylolisthesis: Case Report and Review of the Literature

Background. Although lumbar isthmic spondylolisthesis is frequent in the Caucasian population, its association with spondylodiscitis is extremely rare. Case Description. The authors reported the case of a 44-year-old patient affected by pyogenic spondylodiscitis on previously documented isthmic spondylolisthesis at the L5-S1 level. The patient was surgically treated by circumferential arthrodesis combining anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF), followed by L4-S1 percutaneous osteosynthesis using the same anesthesia. Appropriate antibiotherapy to methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus, found on the intraoperative samplings, was then delivered for 3 months, allowing satisfactory evolution on the clinical, biological, and radiological levels. Discussion. This is the first case report of spondylodiscitis affecting an isthmic spondylolisthesis surgically treated by circumferential arthrodesis. In addition to providing large samplings for analysis, it confirms the observed evolution over the past 30 years in modern care history of spondylodiscitis, increasingly including surgical treatment with spinal instrumentation, thus avoiding the need of an external immobilization. Care must nonetheless be exercised in performing the ALIF because of the inflammatory tissue increasing the risk of vascular injury. Conclusion. Spondylodiscitis occurring on an L5-S1 isthmic spondylolisthesis can be safely managed by circumferential arthrodesis combining ALIF then percutaneous osteosynthesis in the same anesthesia, obviously followed by appropriate antibiotherapy.

Case Report

Misplacement of Tracheostomy Tube in the Right Main Bronchus: a Rare Complication

A 38-year-old woman known case of metastatic squamous cell carcinoma of the cervical esophagus due to increasing dyspnea and stridor attributed to the pressure effect of the primary mass was scheduled for tracheostomy, which ended up in the right main bronchus. This rare complication occurred using a tracheostomy tube number 7.5 via a vertical tracheotomy over 4th and 5th tracheal rings. The misplacement was confirmed by chest X-ray and fiberoptic bronchoscopy, and the tracheostomy tube was successfully repositioned in a nonoperative approach.

Case Report

Abdominoplasty: An Easy Approach to Giant Abdominal Lipomas

Introduction. Giant lipomas, which are greater than 10 cm, are rare, cosmetically unacceptable, and deteriorate the quality of daily living. Removal of giant abdominal lipomas either by liposuction, excision, or both, can lead to the formation of a loose, pendulous drooping abdomen, and abdominal wall laxity, which is aesthetically displeasing. The objective of this case report is to highlight an easy approach to treat giant abdominal lipoma through therapeutic abdominoplasty. Case History. In this case, a 29-year-old man with a known case of hypothyroidism and HCV was in remission but had a huge abdominal mass on his lower left side; it progressed for 7 years and increased in size and caused discomfort. His BMI was 29.53 and the mass measured about  cm. All other investigations were normal and showed no malignancies. He underwent excision of the giant abdominal lipoma using a standard abdominoplasty approach. Conclusion. In conclusion, in selected patients, giant abdominal lipomas can be successfully excised along with the redundant abdominal skin.

Case Report

Management of Tuberculous Cutaneous Fistula

Tuberculosis is an endemic emergency that is prevalent in developing countries, particularly in sub-Saharan Black Africa, including Congo-Brazzaville. In addition to the pulmonary, ganglionic, and bone forms, there are other poorly documented locations. In the Congo, among these is cutaneous tuberculosis which is exceptional. A 9-year-old boy and two adult patients had persistent lesions of the left hip and thigh wounds, chest wall, and hypogastric wound with no healing for more than four months, respectively. Among these patients, one case of tuberculous contact was noted. Histopathological examination revealed a Koester follicle, suggesting a tuberculous skin fistula. A fistulectomy was performed, coupled with a quadruple antituberculous therapy combining rifampicin, isoniazid, ethambutol, and pyrazinamide for two months, relayed by a dual therapy consisting of isoniazid and ethambutol for 6 to 8 months. The evolution was favorable in all cases with healing of the lesions after 3 to 6 weeks. The existence of inexhaustible fistulas and the absence of scarring of a wound should make one suspect, among other things, cutaneous tuberculosis. The product of fistulectomy makes it possible to establish the histological diagnosis of cutaneous tuberculosis.

Case Report

Migrated Tubal Ligation (Filshie) Clip as an Uncommon Cause of Chronic Abdominal Pain

Tubal ligation (TL) is an effective and common method of fertility control. In the year 2009, over 24,000 were performed in Canada alone. Migration of Filshie clips used during TL is estimated to occur in 25% of all patients; 0.1-0.6% of these patients subsequently experience symptoms or extrusion of the clip from anatomical sites such as the anus, vagina, urethra, or abdominal wall. Migrated clips may present as chronic groin sinus, perianal sepsis, or chronic abdominal pain. These symptoms can occur as early as 6 weeks or as late as 21 years after application. We present the case of a 49-year-old female with a 3.5-year history of intermittent dull nonradiating left upper quadrant (LUQ) pain lasting on average 2-3 days. There were no other associated symptoms, and the longest pain-free period was 4 days. Her past medical history includes COPD, GERD, IBS, and depression. Current medications are only remarkable for Symbicort. Pertinent past surgical history includes laparoscopic tubal ligation with Filshie clips in 1999, followed by a vaginal hysterectomy in 2013. Migrated tubal ligation clip was noted on an abdominal X-ray. The patient was then referred for surgical management. Subsequent CT scan confirmed a solitary clip present adjacent to the left lobe of the liver. No other abnormalities were reported. Patient underwent laparoscopy for removal of the clip, which was identified to be underneath the left lobe of the liver embedded in the gastrohepatic omentum. Please see the video link provided. Postoperative pathology report confirmed the presence of a Filshie clip. Patient reported complete resolution of her LUQ pain at a 5-week and 3.5-month follow-up. This case shows that although symptomatic clip migration is a rare phenomenon, it should be given special consideration in women with unexplained chronic abdominal pain and a history of TL. Additionally, removal of clip can provide resolution of symptoms.

Case Reports in Surgery
 Journal metrics
Acceptance rate37%
Submission to final decision87 days
Acceptance to publication19 days
CiteScore-
Impact Factor-
 Submit