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Case Reports in Transplantation
Volume 2013, Article ID 746395, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/746395
Case Report

Artificially Positive Crossmatches Not Leading to the Refusal of Kidney Donations due to the Usage of Adequate Diagnostic Tools

1Tissue Typing Laboratory (GHATT), University Hospital Halle/Saale, Magdeburger Straße 16, 06112 Halle, Germany
2Department of Transfusion Medicine, University Hospital Göttingen, Robert-Koch-Straße 40, 37075 Göttingen, Germany

Received 1 February 2013; Accepted 27 February 2013

Academic Editors: P. A. Andrews, C. F. Classen, C. Costa, I. Engelmann, and R. Grenda

Copyright © 2013 G. Schlaf et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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