Case Reports in Vascular Medicine
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Fourteen-Year Patency of an Anterior Tibial Artery-Saphenous Vein Fistula in an Ambulatory Patient

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Case Reports in Vascular Medicine publishes case reports and case series in all areas of vascular medicine.

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Case Reports in Vascular Medicine maintains an Editorial Board of practicing researchers from around the world, to ensure manuscripts are handled by editors who are experts in the field of study.

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Case Report

May-Thurner Syndrome—a Rare Cause of Extensive Pelvic DVT, but Is there More to Know?

May-Thurner Syndrome (MTS) is a rare anatomical variant characterized by the compression of the left common iliac artery by the right common iliac artery against the fifth lumbar vertebrae. It can present as acute or chronic deep vein thrombosis (DVT), leg pain, varicosities, skin ulceration, and hyperpigmentation. In this case report, we present an interesting case of a young male with no obvious risk factors, who presented with back and left lower extremity pain later diagnosed with MTS on computed tomography angiography (CTA) and venogram. The patient was treated with venoplasty and pharmacomechanical thrombolysis and was discharged on apixaban.

Case Report

A Rare Cardiac Cavernous Hemangioma Treated with Radiotherapy

Background. Although cardiac hemangiomas, as rare benign cardiac tumors, have been described in previous case reports, the role of radiation therapy in an unresectable cardiac hemangioma in adult has not been reported. We present a case report of a rare unresectable cardiac cavernous hemangioma treated with radiotherapy. Case Presentation. A 45-year-old female with new onset of coughing and worsening shortness of breath was found to have a biopsy proven cardiac cavernous hemangioma. Surgery was aborted due to excessive bleeding, and she was then treated with radiotherapy. A total dose of 30 Gy in 15 fractions was given using intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) to the mass with a modified 1 cm margin. Complete clinical symptomatic relief was achieved with reduction of the mass posttreatment. Ten-year follow-up revealed a stable, reduced hemangioma with no recurrence of symptoms. Conclusions. This is a rare example of cardiac hemangioma that developed in the right ventricle and compressed several major vessels. Radiotherapy may be safely used for treatment of unresectable cardiac hemangioma.

Case Report

Angiojet System Used in the Treatment of Submassive Pulmonary Embolism: A Case Report of Two Patients

Background. Massive or submassive pulmonary embolism (PE) carries a high mortality. Percutaneous mechanical thrombectomy using the Angiojet system is accepted for the treatment of PE. Here, we reported two submassive PE cases who were treated with the Angiojet system successfully, to provide some advice for the therapy of submassive PE. Method. Two patients with suffocation were admitted to our hospital. One patient was accompanied by lower blood pressure (20% lower than basal blood pressure) and higher pulmonary artery pressure (89 mmHg); the other patient had larger right ventricular transverse diameter (46 mm), decreased left ventricular end diastolic anteroposterior diameter (34 mm), and higher heartbeats (107 heartbeats per minute). Pulmonary artery computed tomography angiography showed bilateral pulmonary embolism. Result. The Angiojet system with a high-pressure jet spray pattern (urokinase chloride injection 50 ml) was used. Intravascular thrombolysis by urokinase (100 wiu/day for 1 day) was done after being back in the ward. And low molecular weight heparin was used in hospitalization, and rivaroxaban was used after discharge. Both patients were treated successfully. However, the level of platelet was significantly lower in one patient after Angiojet system usage and recovered to the preoperative level the next day. Another patient suffered from bradyarrhythmias during the usage of Angiojet, and bradyarrhythmias disappeared when the Angiojet system stopped. Pulmonary embolism was cured after 3 months in both patients. Conclusion. Angiojet could be a simple, safe, and well-tolerated treatment for massive or submassive PE. And hematocrit, platelet, kidney function, and heart rhythm should be monitored during perioperation.

Case Report

Lingual Raynaud’s Phenomenon after Surgical and Radiotherapeutic Intervention for Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma

Raynaud’s phenomenon of the tongue after radiation therapy with or without chemotherapy is an exceedingly rare complication. Symptoms are similar to Raynaud’s disease of other sites and involve pallor and discomfort on exposure to cold temperatures that resolve with rewarming. Presentation occurs approximately 18-24 months after radiotherapy on average and can usually be managed effectively with lifestyle modification and pharmacotherapy. Here, we present a case of lingual Raynaud’s following surgery and adjuvant radiation therapy in a patient with squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity.

Case Report

Bilateral Hypothenar Hammer Syndrome Case Presentation and Literature Review

Hypothenar hammer syndrome is a rare cause of vascular insufficiency. Generally, patients report a history of repetitive trauma to the hypothenar region of the hand. Symptoms often consist of cold intolerance, pain, paleness, and paresthesia due to digital ischemia. The severity of these symptoms will depend on the extent of ulnar artery occlusion and the presence or absence of collaterals between this artery’s superficial and deep branches. It is a rare clinical entity, which on multiple occasions requires a surgical approach. We present a 63-year-old man with bilateral Raynaud’s phenomenon secondary to hypothenar hammer syndrome successfully treated by vascular repair surgery. In patients with Raynaud’s phenomenon, it is important to know that there are reversible causes such as hypothenar hammer syndrome.

Case Report

Iatrogenic Femoral Arteriovenous Fistula with Pseudoaneurysm Associated with Worsening Heart Failure Years after Percutaneous Impella Placement

Iatrogenic arteriovenous fistulas (AVFs) and pseudoaneurysms (PSAs) are rare complications that may develop years after vascular access, and high-volume flow through these AVFs have been hypothesized to contribute to chronic heart failure. Formation of an AVF or PSA following Impella placement has rarely been described in the literature. Here, we describe a patient who had percutaneous placement of an Impella ventricular assist device through his right groin three years prior, now presenting with worsening heart failure and symptoms of volume overload. He was discovered to have a new, high-flow common femoral artery to femoral vein AVF with an associated PSA. The AVF and associated PSA were resected and repaired. This case study highlights a rare access-site complication from percutaneous Impella placement associated with worsening heart failure, strategies for preventing this complication during peripheral access, and the need to consider this differential in such a patient with a history of peripheral access who has an unexplained worsening of heart failure.

Case Reports in Vascular Medicine
 Journal metrics
See full report
Acceptance rate38%
Submission to final decision98 days
Acceptance to publication15 days
CiteScore-
Journal Citation Indicator-
Impact Factor-
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