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Case Reports in Vascular Medicine
Volume 2014, Article ID 102605, 3 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/102605
Case Report

Surgical Management of Ascending Aortic Aneurysm and Its Complications

1Department of Medicine, Nassau University Medical Center, 2201 Hempstead Turnpike, East Meadow, NY 11554, USA
2NYIT-COM, Nassau University Medical Center, East Meadow, NY, USA
3New York Institute of Technology, College of Osteopathic Medicine, Northern Boulevard, P.O. Box 8000, Old Westbury, NY 11568-8000, USA
4Department of Cardiology, NuHealth, Nassau University Medical Center, 2201 Hempstead Turnpike, East Meadow, NY 11554, USA

Received 15 April 2014; Accepted 13 June 2014; Published 26 June 2014

Academic Editor: Paolo Vanelli

Copyright © 2014 Sisira Sran et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Ascending aortic aneurysms involving the proximal aortic arch, arising anywhere from the aortic valve to the innominate artery, represent various problems in which open surgery is generally required. Surgical options include excision of the aortic pathology or wrapping the aneurysm shell with an aortic Dacron graft. Intervention using the latter method can lead to extravasation of blood along the suture lines resulting in continuous bleeding within the periprosthetic space. The Cabrol technique was developed as a method for decompression of postoperative leaks by the formation of a conduit system from the periprosthetic space to the right atrium. The coronary ostia are anastomosed to a second graft in an end-to-end fashion, which is then anastomosed to the ascending aortic conduit side to side. The native aorta is then sewn around the prosthesis, hereby creating a shunt to drain anastomotic leakage. This shunt reduces postsurgical risk of pseudoaneurysm formation and normally closes a few days following surgery. We discuss the case of a patient who underwent Cabrol’s variation and six months later was demonstrated to have a patent shunt.