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Case Reports in Vascular Medicine
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 236041, 6 pages
Case Report

Spontaneous Thrombosis in Giant Aneurysm of the Anterior Communicating Artery Complex in Pediatric Age: Five-Year Follow-Up

Neurosurgery Department, Garcia de Orta Hospital, Avenida Torrado da Silva, 2801-951 Almada, Portugal

Received 20 June 2014; Accepted 14 August 2014; Published 28 August 2014

Academic Editor: Pascal Jabbour

Copyright © 2014 Vítor M. Gonçalves et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.


Intracranial aneurysms are rare in the pediatric population, especially in infancy, representing less than 1% of all aneurysms. In this age group, they are more frequent at the carotid bifurcation and in the posterior circulation, with a greater number of giant aneurysms and spontaneous aneurysm thrombosis when compared with the adults. They are life-threatening, and, therefore, early investigation, characterization of the lesion, and treatment are essential. The appropriate management depends on the child’s condition, aneurysm characteristics, and the experience of a multidisciplinary team. Noninvasive and radiation-free imagiological studies play an important role in the diagnosis and follow-up of these young patients. We present the case of a 3-month-old boy with an intracranial hemorrhage secondary to the rupture of a giant aneurysm of the anterior communicating artery complex, with spontaneous thrombosis, which is a rare situation due to its location. A conservative approach was assumed and noninvasive evolutive imagiological studies revealed a reduction in the thrombosed aneurysm size and no signs of recanalization. The child recovered to his baseline neurological condition and has had no rehemorrhage until 5 years of follow-up.