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Canadian Respiratory Journal
Volume 2017 (2017), Article ID 1270608, 12 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/1270608
Review Article

Occupational Exposure to Talc Increases the Risk of Lung Cancer: A Meta-Analysis of Occupational Cohort Studies

1Institute of Occupational Medicine and Industrial Hygiene, National Taiwan University College of Public Health, Taipei, Taiwan
2Department of Family Medicine, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan
3Department of Public Health, National Taiwan University College of Public Health, Taipei, Taiwan
4Institute of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, College of Public Health, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan
5Department of Environmental and Occupational Medicine, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan
6Department of Environmental and Occupational Medicine, National Taiwan University College of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan

Correspondence should be addressed to Hsiao-Yu Yang; wt.ude.utn@gnayh

Received 2 February 2017; Revised 21 June 2017; Accepted 17 July 2017; Published 31 August 2017

Academic Editor: Franz Stanzel

Copyright © 2017 Che-Jui Chang et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Objective. Talc is widely used in industrial applications. Previous meta-analyses of carcinogenic effects associated with inhaled talc included publications before 2004, with a lack of data in China, the largest talc-producing country. The safety of workers exposed to talc was unclear due to limited evidence. The objective of this study was to reevaluate the association between inhaled talc and lung cancer. Setting, Participants, and Outcome Measures. A meta-analysis was performed to calculate the meta-SMR of lung cancer. We searched the MEDLINE, EMBASE, CNKI, and Wanfang Data databases through March 2017. Data from observational studies were pooled using meta-analysis with random effects models. Results. Fourteen observational cohort studies (13 publications) were located via literature search. The heterogeneity of the included data was high (-squared = 72.9%). Pooling all the cohorts yielded a meta-SMR of 1.45 (95% CI: 1.22–1.72, ) for lung cancer among the study subjects exposed to talc. Subgroup analysis for asbestos contamination showed no significant difference in lung cancer death between subjects exposed to talc with and without asbestos , indicating that this confounding factor may have no significance. Conclusions. This study provides evidence that nonasbestiform talc might still increase the risk of lung cancer. Further epidemiological studies are required to evaluate the safety of workers with occupational talc exposure.