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Canadian Respiratory Journal
Volume 2017, Article ID 1270608, 12 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/1270608
Review Article

Occupational Exposure to Talc Increases the Risk of Lung Cancer: A Meta-Analysis of Occupational Cohort Studies

1Institute of Occupational Medicine and Industrial Hygiene, National Taiwan University College of Public Health, Taipei, Taiwan
2Department of Family Medicine, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan
3Department of Public Health, National Taiwan University College of Public Health, Taipei, Taiwan
4Institute of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, College of Public Health, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan
5Department of Environmental and Occupational Medicine, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan
6Department of Environmental and Occupational Medicine, National Taiwan University College of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan

Correspondence should be addressed to Hsiao-Yu Yang; wt.ude.utn@gnayh

Received 2 February 2017; Revised 21 June 2017; Accepted 17 July 2017; Published 31 August 2017

Academic Editor: Franz Stanzel

Copyright © 2017 Che-Jui Chang et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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