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Canadian Respiratory Journal
Volume 2017, Article ID 2834956, 7 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/2834956
Review Article

Harmful Effects of Hyperoxia in Postcardiac Arrest, Sepsis, Traumatic Brain Injury, or Stroke: The Importance of Individualized Oxygen Therapy in Critically Ill Patients

1Department of Intensive Care, Erasme Hospital, Université Libre de Bruxelles, 1070 Brussels, Belgium
2Department of Intensive Care, Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, Guangzhou 510060, China

Correspondence should be addressed to Jean-Louis Vincent; gro.evisnetni@tnecnivlj

Received 13 November 2016; Accepted 27 December 2016; Published 26 January 2017

Academic Editor: Wan-Jie Gu

Copyright © 2017 Jean-Louis Vincent et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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