Canadian Respiratory Journal

Inhalation Devices


Status
Published

1Boehringer Ingelheim Pty Limited, Sydney, Australia

2National Heart and Lung Institute, London, UK

3Royal Devon and Exeter Hospital, Exeter, UK


Inhalation Devices

Description

The delivery of drugs by inhalation is an integral component of the treatment and management of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). There are a variety of different drug and inhaler combinations, which increase the likelihood of finding an appropriate inhaler for each individual patient. However, this increases the complexity of inhaler choice for clinicians and may also reduce the physician’s or nurse’s experience with each inhaler, which could impact on a patient’s tuition in the correct use of the prescribed inhaler.

Current levels of asthma control, worldwide, fall short of Global Initiative for Asthma recommendations, the reasons for which include poor compliance with therapy, wrong type of inhaler, and incorrect inhaler technique. The choice of an inhalation device for a patient is therefore as important as the choice of drug for treatment. In COPD, the ability of a patient to operate a device correctly, as well as their willingness to adhere to long-term inhaled medication, may also impact treatment efficacy and subsequent disease control. Physician and patient preferences for devices also influence their selection and use in clinical practice.

We invite authors to contribute original research and review articles that highlight the important role of inhalers in the treatment of both COPD and asthma including future developments and the interface with technology.

Potential topics include but are not limited to the following:

  • Overview of inhalation devices used in asthma and/or COPD
  • Device choices: meeting patients’ needs
  • Compliance and adherence to inhaled therapy
  • Considerations for prescribing inhaled therapy
  • Achieving optimal delivery
  • Interface between inhalers and technology
  • Asthma phenotypes and ACOS
  • Future devices

Articles

  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2018
  • - Article ID 5642074
  • - Editorial

Inhalation Devices

Petra Moroni-Zentgraf | Omar S. Usmani | David M. G. Halpin
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2018
  • - Article ID 3095647
  • - Research Article

Usefulness of Nonvalved Spacers for Administration of Inhaled Steroids in Young Children with Recurrent Wheezing and Risk Factors for Asthma

Carlos Kofman | Alejandro Teper
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2018
  • - Article ID 2525319
  • - Review Article

The Nurse Practitioners’ Perspective on Inhaler Education in Asthma and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

Jane Scullion
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2018
  • - Article ID 1597217
  • - Research Article

Teaching Pharmacy Undergraduate Students Inhaler Device Technique and Exploring Factors Affecting Maintenance of Technique

Mariam Toumas-Shehata | Mark Henricks | ... | Sinthia Bosnic-Anticevich
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2018
  • - Article ID 3238546
  • - Research Article

Asthma and Asthma Medication Are Common among Recreational Athletes Participating in Endurance Sport Competitions

Amanda Näsman | Tommie Irewall | ... | Nikolai Stenfors
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2018
  • - Article ID 2732017
  • - Review Article

Inhaled Therapy in Respiratory Disease: The Complex Interplay of Pulmonary Kinetic Processes

Jens Markus Borghardt | Charlotte Kloft | Ashish Sharma
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2018
  • - Article ID 8959370
  • - Review Article

Inhalation Techniques Used in Patients with Respiratory Failure Treated with Noninvasive Mechanical Ventilation

Patrycja Rzepka-Wrona | Szymon Skoczynski | ... | Adam Barczyk
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2018
  • - Article ID 9473051
  • - Review Article

Matching Inhaler Devices with Patients: The Role of the Primary Care Physician

Alan Kaplan | David Price
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2018
  • - Article ID 4646852
  • - Research Article

Asthma Control and Asthma Medication Use among Swedish Elite Endurance Athletes

Hampus Persson | Anne Lindberg | Nikolai Stenfors
Canadian Respiratory Journal
 Journal metrics
Acceptance rate26%
Submission to final decision45 days
Acceptance to publication33 days
CiteScore2.600
Impact Factor1.639
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