Cardiology Research and Practice
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Acceptance rate26%
Submission to final decision97 days
Acceptance to publication40 days
CiteScore1.970
Impact Factor2.140
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Conversion from Nonshockable to Shockable Rhythms and Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest Outcomes by Initial Heart Rhythm and Rhythm Conversion Time

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 Journal profile

Cardiology Research and Practice publishes original research articles, review articles, and clinical studies focusing on the diagnosis and treatment of cardiovascular diseases, including hypertension, arrhythmia, heart failure, and vascular disease.

 Editor spotlight

Dr. Terrence Ruddy is Director of Nuclear Cardiology at the University of Ottawa Heart Institute, and Professor of Medicine and Radiology at the University of Ottawa. His research is in SPECT and PET imaging techniques in cardiovascular disease.

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Research Article

Omentin-1 Ameliorated Free Fatty Acid-Induced Impairment in Proliferation, Migration, and Inflammatory States of HUVECs

Objectives. Endothelial cell injury is a critical pathological change during the development of atherosclerosis. Here, we explored the effect of omentin-1 on free fatty acid- (FFA-) induced endothelial cell injury. Methods. An FFA-induced endothelial cell injury model was established to investigate the role of omentin-1 in this process. Cell proliferation was analyzed with the Cell Counting Kit assay and flow cytometry. Scratch and transwell assays were used to evaluate cell migration. Factors secreted by endothelial cells after injury were detected by western blotting, reverse-transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and cellular fluorescence assay. Results. Omentin-1 rescued the FFA-induced impaired proliferation and migration capabilities of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). It decreased the number of THP-1 cells attached to HUVECs in response to injury and inhibited the FFA-induced proinflammatory state of HUVECs. Conclusion. Omentin-1 could partly ameliorate FFA-induced endothelial cell injury.

Research Article

Association between Alanine Aminotransferase/Aspartate Aminotransferase Ratio (AST/ALT Ratio) and Coronary Artery Injury in Children with Kawasaki Disease

Objective. To investigate the association between the aspartate aminotransferase (AST)/alanine aminotransferase (ALT) ratio (AST/ALT ratio, AAR) and intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) resistance, coronary artery lesions (CAL), and coronary artery aneurysms (CAA) in children with Kawasaki disease (KD). Design. We retrospectively studied 2678 children with KD and divided them into two groups: a low-AAR group and a high-AAR group with a median AAR of 1.13 as the cut-off point. The differences in laboratory data, clinical manifestations, and coronary artery damage rates were compared between the two groups. Results. The incidence of CAL was higher in the low-AAR group than in the high-AAR group at 2 and 3-4 weeks after illness onset (, respectively). The IVIG resistance rate was significantly higher in the low-AAR group than in the high-AAR group (29.94% vs 21.71%, ). The levels of C-reactive protein, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, white blood cell count, bilirubin, fibrinogen, thrombin time, D-dimer, and brain natriuretic peptide were also significantly higher in the low-AAR group compared with the high-AAR group. The levels of albumin and IgG were significantly lower in the low-AAR group compared with those of the high-AAR group. The proportion of typical KD cases in the low-AAR group was significantly higher than that in the high-AAR group. Low-AAR correlated with the risk of coronary artery damage and IVIG resistance. Conclusion. Children with KD who had low-AAR value were more likely to develop coronary artery damage and IVIG resistance. Low AAR is a risk factor for CAL, CAA, and IVIG resistance in KD.

Research Article

Left Atrial Strain as Evaluated by Two-Dimensional Speckle Tracking Predicts Left Atrial Appendage Dysfunction in Chinese Patients with Atrial Fibrillation

Left atrial appendage (LAA) dysfunction identified by transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) is a powerful predictor of stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). The aim of our study is to assess if there is a correlation between the left atrial (LA) functional parameter and LAA dysfunction in the AF patients. This cross-sectional study included a total of 249 Chinese AF patients who did not have cardiac valvular diseases and were undergoing cardiac ablation. TEE was performed in all the patients who were categorized into two groups according to their left atrial appendage (LAA) function. A total of 120 of the 249 AF patients had LAA dysfunction. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression was conducted to assess the independent factors that correlated with the LAA dysfunction. Different predictive models for the LAA dysfunction were compared with the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve. The final ROC curve on the development and validation datasets was drawn based on the calculation of each area under the curves (AUC). Univariate and multivariate analysis showed that the peak left atrial strain (PLAS) was the most significant factor that correlated with the LAA dysfunction. PLAS did not show inferiority amongst all the models and revealed strong discrimination ability on both the development and validation datasets with AUC 0.818 and 0.817. Our study showed that a decrease in PLAS is independently associated with LAA dysfunction in the AF patients.

Research Article

Reduced Albuminuria and Potassemia Indicate Early Renal Repair Processes after Resynchronization Therapy in Cardiorenal Syndrome Type 2

Background. Patients with chronic cardiorenal syndrome type 2 (T2-CRS) who qualify for resynchronization therapy (CRT) are exposed perioperatively to potentially nephrotoxic factors including contrast agents and blood loss. Methods. The objective of this prospective interventional study was to assess the effects of CRT on renal function in patients with T2-CRS within the first 48 hours following implantation. Initially, 76 patients (15% female; aged 69 ± 9.56 years) with heart failure (New York Heart Association classes II–IV), ejection fraction ≤ 35%, and QRS > 130 ms were included in the study. During CRT implantation, a nonionic contrast agent (72.2 ± 44.9 mL) was administered. Prior to and 48 hours following implantation, renal function was evaluated using the following serum biomarkers: creatinine (sCr), estimated glomerular filtration rate (using the Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration equation [eGFRCKD-EPI]), and the electrolyte and urine biomarkers albumin (uAlb), albumin/creatinine ratio (UACR), and neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (uNGAL). Results. Before CRT, patients classified as NYHA class III or IV had higher uNGAL levels in comparison to uNGAL levels after CRT (43.63 ± 60.02 versus 16.63 ± 18.19; ). After CRT implantation, uAlb, UACR, and potassium levels were reduced (), and uNGAL, sCr, and eGFRCKD-EPI were unchanged. The contrast medium volume did not correlate with the test biomarkers (). Conclusions. In patients with T2-CRS, uNGAL is a biomarker of kidney injury that correlates with the NYHA classes. A stable uNGAL value before and after CRT implantation confirms the lack of risk of contrast-induced nephropathy. Reduced albuminuria and blood potassium are biomarkers of improving T2-CRS in the early post-CRT period.

Research Article

Haemodynamic Effects of Anaemia in Patients with Acute Decompensated Heart Failure

Anaemia is a common comorbidity in patients with heart failure (HF) and is associated with more severe symptoms and increased mortality. The aim of this study was to evaluate haemodynamic profiles of HF patients with respect to the presence of reduced left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) and anaemia. Methods and Results. Haemodynamic status was evaluated in 97 patients with acute decompensated HF. Impedance cardiography, echocardiography, and N-terminal probrain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) results were analysed. The study group was stratified into four subgroups according to LVEF (<40% vs ≥40%) and the presence of anaemia (haemoglobin <13.0 g/dL in men and <12.0 g/dL in women). Thoracic fluid content was higher () in anaemic subjects, while no significant relation between anaemia and NYHA was observed. Anaemic subjects with LVEF ≥ 40% were distinguished from those with LVEF < 40% by significantly higher stroke index (), Heather index (), and acceleration index (). Patients with reduced LVEF and anaemia presented the highest NT-proBNP (). Conclusions. In acute decompensated HF, anaemia is related with fluid overload, relatively higher cardiac systolic performance but no clinical benefit in patients with preserved/midrange LVEF, and increased left ventricular tension, fluid overload, and impaired cardiac systolic performance in patients with reduced LVEF.

Review Article

Impact of Cardiac Rehabilitation on Functional Capacity and Physical Activity after Coronary Revascularization: A Scientific Review

Background. Coronary revascularization procedures often cause lowered exercise capacity and declining physical activity levels. These outcomes are paramount in predicting morbidity and mortality after these procedures. Cardiac rehabilitation (CR) focuses on incrementing cardiovascular endurance, exercise capacity, muscle strength, levels of physical activity, and quality of life through health education and lifestyle modification in post-coronary revascularization patients. Objective. To review the impact of cardiac rehabilitation on functional capacity, levels of physical activity, and health related quality of life in patients following coronary revascularization. Methods. A structured literature search in PubMed, Scopus, CINAHL, and ProQuest for studies focused on CR and its effects on functional capacity, physical activity, and quality of life after coronary revascularization. Results. A total of 2,010 studies were retrieved. Deduplication and eligibility screening included 190 studies after the application of filters. A sum of 21 studies were considered for this review. Most studies reported that exercise and physical activity programs were centre-based and home-based and via telerehabilitation. Treadmill and cycle ergometry training with callisthenics and flexibility exercises in phase 2 CR exhibited significant improvement in functional capacity and physical activity levels in patients after coronary revascularization procedures. Conclusion. Although centre-based supervised CR programs do improve functional capacity after coronary revascularization, home-based or telerehabilitation-based CR programs are feasible, improve patient compliance in improving physical activity, and thereby increase functional capacity. Patient education improves levels of physical activity, health related quality of life, and adherence to home- and centre-based CR programs.

Cardiology Research and Practice
 Journal metrics
Acceptance rate26%
Submission to final decision97 days
Acceptance to publication40 days
CiteScore1.970
Impact Factor2.140
 Submit

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