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Cardiology Research and Practice
Volume 2009, Article ID 194528, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.4061/2009/194528
Research Article

Depression Following Thrombotic Cardiovascular Events in Elderly Medicare Beneficiaries: Risk of Morbidity and Mortality

1Division of Clinical and Outcomes Research, Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute, Albuquerque, NM 87108, USA
2Division of Pharmaceutical Outcomes and Policy, University of North Carolina School of Pharmacy, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA
3Department of Pharmaceutical Health Services Research, School of Pharmacy, University of Maryland, Baltimore, MD 21201, USA
4Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, School of Medicine, University of Maryland, Baltimore, MD 21201, USA
5Department of Pharmacy Practice, School of Pharmacy, University of Maryland, Baltimore, MD 21201, USA

Received 22 May 2009; Revised 7 August 2009; Accepted 24 September 2009

Academic Editor: John Longhurst

Copyright © 2009 Christopher M. Blanchette et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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