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Cardiology Research and Practice
Volume 2014, Article ID 963264, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/963264
Review Article

Filters in 2D and 3D Cardiac SPECT Image Processing

11st Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Aretaieion Hospital, University of Athens, 11528 Athens, Greece
22nd Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Aretaieion Hospital, University of Athens, 11528 Athens, Greece

Received 23 October 2013; Accepted 20 January 2014; Published 1 April 2014

Academic Editor: Gavin W. Lambert

Copyright © 2014 Maria Lyra et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Nuclear cardiac imaging is a noninvasive, sensitive method providing information on cardiac structure and physiology. Single photon emission tomography (SPECT) evaluates myocardial perfusion, viability, and function and is widely used in clinical routine. The quality of the tomographic image is a key for accurate diagnosis. Image filtering, a mathematical processing, compensates for loss of detail in an image while reducing image noise, and it can improve the image resolution and limit the degradation of the image. SPECT images are then reconstructed, either by filter back projection (FBP) analytical technique or iteratively, by algebraic methods. The aim of this study is to review filters in cardiac 2D, 3D, and 4D SPECT applications and how these affect the image quality mirroring the diagnostic accuracy of SPECT images. Several filters, including the Hanning, Butterworth, and Parzen filters, were evaluated in combination with the two reconstruction methods as well as with a specified MatLab program. Results showed that for both 3D and 4D cardiac SPECT the Butterworth filter, for different critical frequencies and orders, produced the best results. Between the two reconstruction methods, the iterative one might be more appropriate for cardiac SPECT, since it improves lesion detectability due to the significant improvement of image contrast.