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Cardiology Research and Practice
Volume 2017, Article ID 5481671, 10 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/5481671
Research Article

The Relationship between Body Mass Index and the Severity of Coronary Artery Disease in Patients Referred for Coronary Angiography

1Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Faculty of Medicine, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John’s, NL, Canada A1B 3V6
2Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John’s, NL, Canada A1B 3V6
3School of Pharmacy, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John’s, NL, Canada A1B 3V6
4Eastern Health, St. John’s, NL, Canada A1B 3V6

Correspondence should be addressed to Deborah M. Gregory; ac.num@yrogergd

Received 10 January 2017; Accepted 27 March 2017; Published 23 April 2017

Academic Editor: Robert Chen

Copyright © 2017 Anne B. Gregory et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Background and Aim. Obesity is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease and may be associated with more severe coronary artery disease (CAD); however, the relationship between body mass index [BMI (kg/m2)] and CAD severity is uncertain and debatable. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between BMI and angiographic severity of CAD. Methods. Duke Jeopardy Score (DJS), a prognostic tool predictive of 1-year mortality in CAD, was assigned to angiographic data of patients ≥18 years of age (). Patients were grouped into 3 BMI categories: normal (18.5–24.9 kg/m2), overweight (25.0–29.9 kg/m2), and obese (≥30 kg/m2); and multivariable adjusted hazard ratios for 1-year all-cause and cardiac-specific mortality were calculated. Results. Cardiac risk factor prevalence (e.g., diabetes, hypertension, and hyperlipidemia) significantly increased with increasing BMI. Unadjusted all-cause and cardiac-specific 1-year mortality tended to rise with incremental increases in DJS, with the exception of DJS 6 (). After adjusting for potential confounders, no significant association of BMI and all-cause (HR 0.70, 95% CI .48–1.02) or cardiac-specific (HR 1.11, 95% CI .64–1.92) mortality was found. Conclusions. This study failed to detect an association of BMI with 1-year all-cause or cardiac-specific mortality after adjustment for potential confounding variables.