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Discrete Dynamics in Nature and Society
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 374521, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/374521
Research Article

How Do Sociodemographics and Activity Participations Affect Activity-Travel? Comparative Study between Women and Men

Min Yang,1,2,3 Wei Wang,1,2,3 Feifei Yu,1 and Jian Ding1

1School of Transportation, Southeast University, No. 2 Sipailou, Nanjing 210096, China
2Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Urban ITS, Southeast University, China
3Jiangsu Province Collaborative Innovation Center of Modern Urban Traffic Technologies, China

Received 6 July 2014; Accepted 25 August 2014; Published 2 September 2014

Academic Editor: Yongjun Shen

Copyright © 2014 Min Yang et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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